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What should I know about health metrics in the Fitbit app?

 Know your body better with health metrics in the Fitbit app.

 The Health Metrics tile and the metrics displayed in the tile are not available in all regions. To see if the Health Metrics tile  is available in your region, see the health metrics page on the Fitbit website. This feature and the metrics within this feature are not intended to diagnose or treat any medical condition and should not be relied on for any medical purposes. It is intended to provide information that can help you manage your well-being. If you have any concerns about your health, please talk to a healthcare provider. If you believe you are experiencing a medical emergency, call emergency services.

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What are health metrics in the Fitbit app?

This feature tracks key metrics detected by your Fitbit device so that you can see trends and assess what’s changed over time. The Health Metrics tile  in the Fitbit app includes:

  • Breathing rate
  • Heart-rate variability (HRV)
  • Skin temperature variation
  • Oxygen saturation (SpO2)
  • Resting heart rate (RHR)
Who can see health metrics in the Fitbit app?

The Health Metrics tile  in the Fitbit app is available for customers with a compatible device. If data doesn't appear for a metric, your device might not support it.

 

Breathing Rate

HRV

Skin Temperature Variation

SpO2

RHR
Alta HR    
Blaze    
Charge 2    
Charge 3    

Charge 4

Charge 5
Charge 6
Google Pixel Watch    
Google Pixel Watch 2
Inspire 2  
Inspire 3
Inspire HR    
Luxe
Sense series
Versa series
How do I see health metrics in the Fitbit app?

Wear your device for at least a full day, including to sleep at night (Note: skin temperature requires 3 nights of data). Check your stats after you wake up.

  1. In the morning, open the Fitbit app and tap the Today tab   Health Metrics .
  2. Swipe up to see your data for the previous night.
  3. For details about a metric, tap Learn More above the graph.

What does each Fitbit health metric mean?
Metric Significance

Breathing Rate

This metric is the number of breaths you take per minute. Your body usually adjusts your breathing rate to help you get enough oxygen. Typically, breathing rate is 12-20 breaths per minute.

Track your average breathing rate during sleep to help you assess your overall well-being. Typically, your average breathing rate during sleep won’t vary significantly from night to night.

Factors that can affect breathing rate include age, sex, weight, lung and heart conditions, anxiety, and fever.

For more information, see How do I track breathing rate in the Fitbit app?

Heart-Rate Variability

This metric is the variation in time between heartbeats. If your heart rate is 60 beats per minute (bpm), it doesn’t mean that your heart beats once a second. Your autonomic nervous system (ANS) determines the timing of each heartbeat. We use the common formula called the RMSSD to determine heart-rate variability (HRV) from your heart-rate data.

HRV varies from person to person. Age, sex, sleep, hormones, circadian rhythm, and other factors (for example, caffeine or alcohol intake, exercise, and stress) can affect HRV.

Studies show that a higher HRV is linked with better health. A significant drop in HRV may indicate that your body is experiencing stress, strain, or showing potential signs of illness.

For more information, see How do I track heart rate with my Fitbit device?

Skin Temperature

This metric is the variation in your skin temperature taken from your wrist while you sleep.

Core temperature is the temperature inside your body, which is usually taken with a thermometer. Skin temperature is the temperature on the skin's surface. It’s normal for skin temperature to vary throughout sleep and from night to night.

Factors that may cause skin temperature to vary nightly include changes in room temperature, bedding, circadian rhythm, menstrual cycle, or the potential onset of fever.

Note: Significant changes in ambient temperature may negatively impact skin temperature tracking.

For more information see, How can Fitbit help me track my temperature?

Oxygen Saturation (SpO2)

This metric estimates the amount of oxygen in your blood. Nighttime SpO2 is usually lower than daytime SpO2 due to the fact that your breathing rate is usually slower during sleep. In general, SpO2 values during sleep are typically above 90%.

Tracking SpO2 can help you be more aware of your oxygen saturation trends during sleep. The oxygen levels in your blood tend to remain relatively constant, even during exercise and sleep.

Note: To collect SpO2 data, install an SpO2 clock face (available on Sense, Versa, Versa Lite Edition, Versa 2, and Versa 3) or the SpO2 app (available on Charge 4, Charge 5, Charge 6, Luxe, Sense, Sense 2, Versa 3, and Versa 4).

For more information, see How do I track blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) with my Fitbit device?

Resting Heart Rate

This metric is the number of times your heart beats per minute when you are still and well-rested.

Resting heart rate typically ranges from 60-100 bpm, but this range can vary based on age and fitness level. Resting heart rate can be an important indicator of your fitness level and overall cardiovascular health. In general, active people often have a lower resting heart rate.

Several factors can affect resting heart rate: stress, alcohol or caffeine intake, or fever usually raises your resting heart rate, while exercise or meditation can lower it. Air temperature and certain medications can also affect your heart rate.

For more information, see How do I track heart rate with my Fitbit device?

What is my health metrics personal range?
Your personal range, which is based on the average of your recent data, can help you to see trends in your readings. We calculate your personal range for each health metric based on up to 30 days of data.
Why don't I see health metrics data?
  • Wear your device for at least 1 full day (during the day and to sleep at night). Check your stats after you wake up in the morning. Note: skin temperature requires 3 nights of data.
  • Make sure the back of your device is in contact with your skin. The band should be snug but not constricting. If you experience any discomfort, loosen the band, and if it persists give your wrist a break by taking it off.
  • Most metrics require at least 3 hours of quality sleep. If you move a lot during your sleep or the sleep session is too short, you might not get a reading.
  • To track your blood oxygen saturation, confirm you have an SpO2 clock face installed (available on Sense, Versa, Versa Lite Edition, Versa 2, and Versa 3) or the SpO2 app (available on Charge 4, Charge 5, Charge 6, Inspire 3, Luxe, Sense, Sense 2, Versa 3, and Versa 4). For more information, see How do I track blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) with my Fitbit device?
What should I do if I'm concerned about my data?
This feature and the metrics within this feature are not intended to diagnose or treat any medical condition and should not be relied on for any medical purposes. It is intended to provide information that can help you manage your well-being. If you have any concerns about your health, talk to a healthcare provider. If you believe you are experiencing a medical emergency, call emergency services.

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