How do I track blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) with my Fitbit device?

Your Fitbit device uses sensors to estimate your blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) while you sleep. 

The Fitbit SpO2 feature is intended for general wellness purposes only and should not be used or relied on for any medical purposes. Consult your health care professional about any questions or health issues you may have.

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What is SpO2?
Your blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) is the percentage of your blood that’s saturated with, or contains, oxygen. The oxygen levels in your blood tend to remain relatively constant, even during exercise and sleep.
How can I see my SpO2 reading?
 
To collect SpO2 data, install an SpO2 clock face or the SpO2 app.
Note: SpO2 tracking is automatically added on Google Pixel Watch and Google Pixel Watch 2. You don’t need to install a clock face or app. Update to the latest firmware if you don’t see the feature on your watch. For instructions on how to update, see support.google.com.

 Fitbit SpO2 isn’t available in all regions. For more information on availability, see fitbit.com.

SpO2 clock face (Inspire 3, Sense series, and Versa series only)

To install an SpO2 clock face:

  1. From the Today tab in the Fitbit app, tap the devices icon   your device.
  2. Tap GalleryClocks tab.
  3. Search for “SpO2”.
  4. Tap the clock face you want to install  Install. Follow the on-screen instructions to grant the required permissions and install the clock face.
SpO2 app (Charge 4, Charge 5, Charge 6, Inspire 3, Luxe, Sense series, Versa 3, and Versa 4 only)

On certain Fitbit devices, the SpO2 app is automatically added for users in select countries. If it’s not installed:

  1. From the Today tab in the Fitbit app, tap the devices icon   your device.
  2. Tap Gallery.
  3. Search for “SpO2”.
  4. In the results, tap SpO2 or SpO2 Tracker  Install.

The SpO2 app doesn’t appear as an app on your watch; instead, it runs in the background to track your SpO2 data.

If you have trouble adding an SpO2 clock face or the SpO2 app to your Fitbit device, make sure you update your Fitbit device to run the latest firmware version. For instructions, see How do I update my Fitbit device?

See your most recent SpO2 levels on your device

SpO2 clock face (Inspire 3, Sense series, and Versa series only)

See your nightly SpO2 data on an SpO2 clock face:

  1. Wear your Fitbit device to bed, and sync it in the morning.
  2. Check your clock face to see your average SpO2 level and the range of values detected.

It may take around an hour for your SpO2 values to appear on the clock face after you sync your device. The clock face shows data for your most recent sleep session. If your sleep session is split into 2 separate logs or you take a long nap, the clock face updates to show data for the most recent sleep session after your device syncs with the Fitbit app.

SpO2 app (Charge 4, Charge 5, Charge 6, Inspire 3, Luxe, Sense series, Versa 3, and Versa 4 only)

See your nightly SpO2 data in your daily stats:

  1. Check your daily stats:
    • Sense series, Versa 3, and Versa 4–Open the Today app  on your watch.
    • Charge 4, Charge 5, Charge 6, Inspire 3, and Luxe–Swipe up from the clock face.
  2. Swipe up to find the Oxygen Saturation or SpO2 tile. You see your most recent average resting SpO2 level.
  3. On Sense and Versa 3, tap the Oxygen Saturation tile to see your SpO2 range and 7-day graph.

It may take around an hour for your SpO2 values to appear after you wake up. The tile shows data for your most recent sleep session. If your sleep session is split into 2 separate logs or you take a long nap, the tile updates to show data for the most recent sleep session.

Fitbit Today app (Google Pixel Watch and Google Pixel Watch 2 only)
  1. Open the Fitbit Today app  on your watch.
  2. Swipe up to find the Oxygen Saturation tile. You see your most recent average resting SpO2 level.
  3. Tap the Oxygen Saturation tile to see your SpO2 range and 7-day graph.

Track your SpO2 trends in the Fitbit app

See your SpO2 trends in the Health Metrics tile in the Fitbit app on your phone.

  1. Wear your device for at least a full day, including to sleep at night.
  2. In the morning, open the Fitbit app and tap the Health Metrics tile.
  3. Tap Oxygen Saturation.
Note that for Versa, Versa Lite Edition, and Versa 2, SpO2 data is only collected when you use an SpO2 clock face. For Inspire 3, Sense series, Versa 3, and Versa 4, you can install either an SpO2 clock face or the SpO2 app to collect SpO2 data. Charge 4, Charge 5, Charge 6, and Luxe users must have the SpO2 app installed. SpO2 data is tracked automatically on Google Pixel Watch and Google Pixel Watch 2; you don’t need to install a clock face or app.
How does my Fitbit device measure my SpO2 level?

Your Fitbit device measures your SpO2 levels while you sleep using red and infrared sensors on the back of the device. The sensors shine red and infrared light onto your skin and blood vessels, and use the reflected light that bounces back to estimate how much oxygen is in your blood:

  • Richly oxygenated blood reflects more red light than infrared light.
  • Poorly oxygenated blood reflects more infrared light than red light.
Note that you might see the red and infrared sensors continue to blink for around 30 minutes after you wake up.
What should I know about SpO2 values?
SpO2 values naturally vary, and nighttime SpO2 is usually lower than daytime SpO2 due to the fact that your breathing rate is usually slower during sleep. In general, SpO2 values during sleep are typically above 90%. The SpO2 values presented are an estimate and in general can be influenced by your activity, altitude, and overall health.
Why did I receive a low SpO2 value?

You may notice an SpO2 value that seems lower than expected. This can be due to:

  • Your arm position and movement
  • The position and fit of your Fitbit device
  • Limited blood flow to the surface of the skin
  • Differences in anatomical body structures can also impact the accuracy of your Fitbit device’s sensors.

Several factors can affect your body's ability to maintain blood oxygen levels. These include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • There must be enough oxygen in the air you are breathing.
  • Your lungs must be able to inhale air containing oxygen and exhale carbon dioxide.
  • Your bloodstream must be able to carry oxygen throughout your body.

An issue with any of these factors could impact your SpO2 values. For example, in high altitudes the air is less dense and therefore contains less oxygen. If you experience low SpO2 values while at high altitudes you may want to consider descending to a lower altitude.

Certain health problems can also impact the body's ability to take in oxygen. These factors can be compounded under more extreme circumstances such as during intensive exercise.

You should not use or rely on the SpO2 reading on your Fitbit device for any medical purposes. If you have concerns about your health, you should consult your healthcare provider.

Why didn’t I receive SpO2 data?

If you see the message “SpO2 not installed” on your clock face, install the SpO2 Tracker app. For instructions, see How do I track blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) with my Fitbit device?.

If you see dashed lines on the clock face or SpO2 tile, a message that the SpO2 data couldn’t be read, or missing data in the Health Metrics tile in the Fitbit app on your phone, keep in mind the following:

  • Your device doesn’t retroactively measure your SpO2 values. When you start using Fitbit SpO2, you’ll see dashed lines until after your next sleep session.
  • You must get at least 3 hours of quality sleep. Data is only collected when you’re still. If you move a lot during your sleep or the sleep session is too short, you might not get SpO2 data.
  • Charge your Fitbit device to make sure it’s able to collect data throughout your entire sleep session. Note that you may have to charge your Fitbit device more often when using an SpO2 clock face or app.
  • You must sync your Fitbit device with the Fitbit app before the clock shows your SpO2 data. Note that it may take around an hour for your SpO2 values to appear after you sync your device. For troubleshooting syncing, see Why won't my Fitbit device sync?
  • Turning off any SpO2 clock face or app permissions can cause the feature to stop functioning. For instructions on adjusting permissions, see How do I install and manage apps on my Fitbit device?
  • Your Fitbit device must be able to consistently track your SpO2 data:
    • Wear your device slightly higher on your wrist.
    • Make sure your device is in contact with your skin.
    • Your device should be snug but not constricting.
    • Tattooed skin can impact the accuracy of the red and infrared sensors on your Fitbit device.

For Google Pixel Watch and Google Pixel Watch 2 users, if you don’t see the SpO2 tile or the tile is missing data, make sure the Fitbit and Health Services apps are up-to-date. For instructions on how to update apps, see support.google.com.

How do I remove SpO2 tracking from my Fitbit device?
To remove SpO2 tracking from your device, you must remove both the SpO2 clock face and the SpO2 app. One or both might be installed depending on your Fitbit device. Note that SpO2 tracking is automatically added on Google Pixel Watch and Google Pixel Watch 2. It doesn’t use a clock face or app and can’t be removed.
SpO2 clock face

To remove SpO2 tracking, change your clock face to one not listed in the SpO2 clock face category:

  1. From the Today tab in the Fitbit app, tap the devices icon   your device.
  2. Tap Gallery  Clocks tab.
  3. Browse the available clock faces. Tap the clock face you want Install. Follow the on-screen instructions to install the new clock face.
SpO2 app

Uninstall the SpO2 app:

  1. From the Today tab in the Fitbit app, tap the devices icon   your device.
  2. Tap Gallery  SpO2 or SpO2 Tracker Uninstall  Uninstall.
Does using an SpO2 clock face or app affect the battery life of my Fitbit device?
You may have to charge your Fitbit device more often when collecting SpO2 data.
What’s the difference between estimated oxygen variability and SpO2?

Estimated oxygen variation (EOV) is an estimate of the changes in your blood oxygen saturation levels. For instructions, see How do I track my estimated oxygen variation in the Fitbit app? The EOV feature is designed to see specific events overnight when your blood oxygen saturation levels varied, which could indicate breathing disturbances.

Fitbit SpO2 estimates your average blood oxygen saturation levels and range while you sleep. It’s designed to see potential changes to your fitness and wellness.

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