Rate your content with Self-Certification

You can self-rate your content and understand if a video meets our advertiser-friendly content guidelines.

You’ll see 3 options in this article:

  • You can turn on ads for this content: This type of content meets our advertiser-friendly content guidelines.
  • You can turn on ads but only brands who opt in will run ads: By default, advertisers won’t run on this content, but some brands will opt in to show ads.This means you may earn less revenue on this content (because fewer ads are likely to appear) compared to content that’s suitable for all advertisers.
  • You should turn off ads for this content: This type of content is not suitable for any of our advertisers. You should turn off ads.

Keep in mind that anything you post on YouTube must meet our Community Guidelines. Our advertiser-friendly content guidelines are an extra set of rules on top of the Community Guidelines. Our guidelines outline the kinds of content that may get full or limited monetization. If it’s not ad-friendly, then you should turn off ads.

We’re not telling you what to create. Each and every creator on YouTube is unique and contributes to the vibrancy of YouTube. These guidelines aim to help you understand more clearly the types of content that advertisers may not wish to appear against. While certain types of content may not be suitable for all brands, you could still earn money from YouTube Premium and features like Super Chat and channel memberships.

What you’ll find in this article
Below you will find each questionnaire section and a breakdown of the kinds of content that also fall into each category. Note that all examples given below are non-exhaustive.

Inappropriate language

Frequent use of strong profanity.

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None, or light profanity (like “hell,” or “damn”); censored profanity in the title, thumbnail, or opening of the video (roughly the first 30 seconds); infrequent usage of strong profanity (like the "f-word”) after the opening; or strong profanity in a music video.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

  • Thumbnails that use censored profanity.

Definitions:

  • “Censored profanity” refers to things like bleeping or muting the word as well as covering written words with black bars, symbols, or text added in post-production.
  • The “opening” of a video refers to the beginning of the video (approximately the first 30 seconds).
  • Strong profanity refers to words such as the “f-word”, its derivations and any equivalents.
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Strong profanity in the title, thumbnail, or opening of a video (roughly the first 30 seconds); strong profanity in the title or thumbnail of a music video; strong profanity used frequently throughout the video.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

  • Titles that include strong profanity in the title even when misspelled, such as “This is bull sh1t!”

Definitions:

  • “Strong profanity” refers to words like “bitch,” “shit,” or the “f-word.”
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Extreme profanity used in the title, thumbnail or at any point throughout the video, for example "c*nt," "n***er," "fa**ot," or other hateful slurs.

Adult Content

Sexual behavior, language, or expressions, including both real and computer-generated visuals. 
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None, or romance or kissing; discussions of romantic relationships or sexuality without reference to intercourse; moderately sexually suggestive content that may include limited clothing; sensual dancing, non-graphic sex education, or a music video containing sexual content without nudity.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

Sexually gratifying content

  • Romantic scenes that aren’t sexually gratifying such as animated, real-life, or dramatized kiss scenes.
    • Scenes involving sexual tension between characters without explicit depictions of sexual acts.
    • A kissing scene where the focus is the romance itself and is not intended to be sexually gratifying.
       
  • Discussions of sex in a non-sexually gratifying/comedic context such as sex education that might be delivered in a school context.
    • Scientific representations of reproductive anatomy using diagrams or dummies. 
    • Discussions of sexual orientation and/or how sexual identity evolves amid relationships. 
       
  • Sensual dance moves in a professional setting that are a part of artistic expressions.
    • Dance moves that resemble implied sexual acts (e.g. chest heaving or hip thrusting) as a part of choreographic dance.
       
  • Dances typically associated with sensuality (e.g. pole dance) performed in professional settings such as dance studios.

Nudity

  • Censored nudity where nudity isn’t the focus such as a sauna scene where no nipples, butt or genitalia are visible (e.g. they are pixelated/blurred).
    • Blurred nudity of historical figures wearing limited clothing in educational contexts. 
    • Fully-censored genitalia that are indiscernible and shown for non-sexual purposes (e.g. medical procedure).
    • Depictions of breastfeeding (without nipples being visible).
       
  • Depictions of people wearing limited clothing where the presentation isn’t intended to be sexually gratifying such as bikinis worn at the swimming pool.
    • Clothing reviews focused on the form and function of the clothing rather than a sustained focus on body parts underneath, such as breasts.
    • Artistic expressions such as sculptures, sketches, or computer-generated graphics involving illustrated nudity, such as characters in classic art or photography of indigenous people in loincloths.
    • Translucent or sheer coverings of female breasts/cleavage, buttocks or male torsos seen in appropriate settings such as fashion show runways, medical exams, or at a recreational beach. 
    • Visible partial nudity as part of sports such as boxing where such attire may be required.

Definitions:

  • Sexually gratifying: Content likely to or intended to arouse the viewer.
  • Implied sexual act: Behavior that mimics sexual intercourse such as dry humping.
  • Sexually suggestive: Visual, verbal or textual material with sexual undertones, implying sexual intent in order to provoke sexual arousal.
  • Graphicness: How explicitly the sexual act or nudity is portrayed in order to excite the audience.
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Blurred or censored nudity, even if used for education, news, or in other contexts; focus on sexual body parts (even if covered), discussions of intimate sexual experiences, implied sexual acts, sex toys without human contact or nudity, or realistic representations of genitalia.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

Sexually gratifying content 

  • Titles or thumbnails with sexualized themes (including misleading signals) 
    • Descriptions of or implicit references to sexual activities (e.g.implicit reference to sexual body parts using emojis or graphics).
    • Circling out or otherwise calling attention to something in a thumbnail which suggests implied sexual acts.
    • Misleading title where a video promises sexual content, but it doesn't actually contain sexual content. 
       
  • Depictions of non-titillating sexual activities in educational, documentary, or dramatized content
    • Sexual activities and their histories explained for educational purposes such as with medical topics.
    • Raw footage of animals mating, even if only intended to be comedic.
       
  • Implicit sexual act or behavior
    • Certain signs in a video which suggest sexual activity is occurring such as with shaking objects, moaning sounds, etc.
  • Depictions of sex toys, sexual devices, or other products intended to enhance sexual activity even where they aren’t in use. 
    • Unintentional display of a sexual device in a video that is irrelevant to sexual topics (e.g. displayed in the background).
    • A medical object which resembles genitalia introduced during a discussion.
       
  • Scenes with sexual tension like gratifying sensual dancing, groping, or making out to arouse audiences
    • Short scenes on sexual activities as a part of a larger narrative.  
    • Professional dance choreography which frequently features sexually gratifying poses or moves (e.g. grinding) in limited clothing (e.g. sheer breast coverings).
  • Discussions of intimate sexual experiences such as masturbation, intercourse, tips, or other sexual acts. This may also include sexual innuendos or sexually explicit text or audio, such as detailed conversations about sex.
    • Audio or sound compilations of sexual acts without pictures or visual scenes of the act. 
    • Descriptions of sexual activities which intend to arouse audiences.
    • Mentions of sexual fetishes even when it’s not descriptive. 
       
  • Sex-related content, such as documentaries about the sex industry or paid subscription adult content platforms.

Nudity

  • Educational or documentary content featuring full nudity 
    • History or industry overviews relating to sex or nudity, such as showcasing full body paintings. 
  • Pixelated or censored nudity where the sexual body parts are still recognizable.
    • Scenes with naked bodies starred or blurred, but still identifiable from their silhouettes.
  • Non-fleeting depictions of nudity (animated, real-life, or dramatized). 
    • Sexualized limited clothing (e.g. bikini, lingerie) worn and shown repeatedly as a central subject. 
       
  • Depictions of sexual body parts such as recurring or focal shots of cleavage or bulges intended to arouse audiences. 
    • Compilations of visibly recognizable turgid genital outlines.  
    • Minimally-covered (e.g. thong) sexual body parts (e.g. breasts, cleavages, buttocks, etc.,) frequently appearing in a body cam.  
    • How-to videos on breastfeeding with visible nipples.
    • Sensual dancing (e.g. twerking) with minimal clothing in a professional setting. 
       
  • Depictions of non-sexually gratifying objects resembling genitalia such as packing devices, or the use of daily objects (e.g. eggplant) intended to resemble genitals and titillate audiences.

Definitions:

  • “Censored nudity” refers to things like blurring, covering nudity with black bars or pixelation.
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Exposed breasts or full nudity, sexual acts, animal mating, discussion of fetishes, or a video thumbnail with sexual content.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

  • Mature activity such as full exposure of sexual body parts, sex acts.
  • Sex-related entertainment such as porn or other sexual services.
  • Graphic sexual acts or simulations intended to gratify.
  • Depictions or discussions of fetishes.
  • Focus on sex scandals or the leaking of private intimate material.
  • Imitating or mimicking sexual activities.
  • Promotions of sexual acts in exchange for compensation.
  • Sensual dance in a non-professional setting
    • Grinding or daggering moves calling for sexual tension.

Violence

Content where the focal point is on blood, violence, or injury, when presented without other context, is not suitable for advertising. If you're showing violent content in a news, educational, artistic, or documentary context, that additional context is important. For example, if a video provides authoritative news reporting on a violent event in a journalistic context, it may be eligible for monetization. Violence in the normal course of video gameplay is generally acceptable for advertising, but montages where gratuitous violence is the focal point is not. All games (whether realistic or non-realistic) are in scope of this policy.

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None, Violence that occurs as part of unedited video gameplay; mild violence with minimal blood; dead bodies that are fully censored, blurred, prepared for burial, or shown in historical events like wars, as part of an educational video.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

General violence 

  • Dramatized content containing unrealistic non-graphic violence or fleeting vivid violence 
    • In the course of larger narrative, showing a quick fleeting scene involving physical harm (e.g. shot in the abs) as a part of a violent action scene. 
    • Fighting violence excerpts from an action movie where injuries are mostly indiscernible.
  • Depiction of non-graphic injury such as falling on knees which occurs where no or limited amount of blood is shown.
    • Tumbling down a hill or running into a wall accidentally or purposely as a part of script or sports.  
  • Announcement of tragedies involving multiple casualties which doesn’t include vivid gruesome details. 
    • Reports of a recent homicide in the town without the description of physical state of the victims. 

Gaming

  • Violence as part of standard video gameplay, where it’s mildly graphic.
    • Showing graphic scenes (e.g. a gory attack where impact is clearly visible) in a normal course of gameplay.  

Death & tragedy 

  • Non-graphic depiction of dead bodies in educational context.
    • Public honoring of the deceased, broadcasted with a non-graphic dead body.
    • Display of fully censored or non-gruesome dead bodies in a historical context.

Hunting

  • Hunting content where there’s no depiction of graphic animal injuries or prolonged suffering.
    • Hunting videos where the moment of kill or injury is indiscernible, and with no focal footage of how this dead animal is processed for trophy or food purposes.

Animal violence

  • Non-graphic depictions of animal violence in nature.
    • Predators running after their prey where the graphic details (e.g. focus on bloody body parts of the prey or graphic moments of catching the prey) are not included; some blood may be visible fleetingly, but is not the focal subject of the content.

Animal abuse

  • Raw footage of human-controlled animal violence (e.g., bullfighting) without promotion of the acts.
     
  • Coverage or discussion of animal abuse with no footage of the abuse.
    • A debate on animal abuse lacking details on the abusive act itself.

Violence in sports play

  • Violence in combat sports involving weapons (e.g. fencing) regardless of protective gear worn or safety precautions warranted. 
  • Non-graphic injuries in sports or graphic injuries as part of sports play where blood is shown.
    • Sports conducted in a professional setting (e.g. in a fitness center) while players wear proper gloves and mouthguards.   
    • A fleeting display of injuries that may be graphic (e.g. a broken arm), but are part of regular sports play.
    • Minor non-graphic injuries (e.g. falling on knees) portrayed in the sports play.

Street fights

  • Depiction of fights in an educational context.
    • Self-defense moves that are shared as a tutorial. 
    • People fighting without repeated tough physical interaction (e.g. fist fight) as a fleeting subject in a larger context.

Law enforcement & physical altercation 

  • Non-combative or non-abrasive interactions with law enforcement.
    • Fleeting raw footage of police interaction with civilians for educational purposes without portrayal of explicit abusive physical altercation in descriptions, audio or visual formats. 
    • Normal interaction with police (i.e asking for directions or receiving a parking ticket, etc.).

Definitions:

  • “Mild violence” refers to scuffles in real-life content or fleeting violence like punching.
  • “Dramatized” refers to scripted content such as movies or fictional settings including animated content.
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Edited video gameplay with some clips that focus on graphic violence; moderate violence that shows blood; dead bodies prepared for burial or shown in historical events like wars, as part of a non-educational video.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

General violence

  • Real-life or dramatized violence that results in serious injury where the aftermath or impact is visible and present such as blood or gore scenes, bones visibly broken.
    •  A dramatized long-form video content with a short, ultra-graphic violent scene (e.g. a mass killing) or a video compilation of such graphic scenes. 
    • Highly vivid descriptions of tragedies (in the form of audio or video). 

Gaming

  • Edited video gameplay with some clips that focus on graphic violence
    • Brutal killings or severe injuries (e.g. beheadings) with bodily fluids and parts shown focally in some parts of the video 

Death & tragedy

  • Dead bodies (outside of those prepared for burial) in the context of educational or documentary content such as war documentaries.
    • A dead body without visible injuries or bodily fluid shown in news reporting. 
    • Graphic dead bodies (including depictions of mutilation or injuries) displayed for educational purposes. 

Street fights

  • Street fights featured in the context of educational or documentary purposes. 
    • Graphic street fights including scenes featuring severe injuries, physical attacks, and emotional distress (e.g. yelling). 
    • When the focal subject is around human fights (e.g. footage of prisoners fighting). 

Law enforcement & physical altercation 

  • Violent, combative or abrasive interactions with law enforcement in an educational context or as a part of a larger narrative. 
    • Shocking police altercations displaying rough physical interactions (e.g. hitting or pushing civilians down against the floor). 

Violence in sports play 

  • Graphic sports injuries as part of a larger video with context (e.g. compilations involving graphic injuries but not singularly focused on them).

Animal violence

  • Animal violence in nature with portrayals of graphic animal injuries.
    • When clearly visible injuries (e.g. blood or bones) are the central subject of a video.

Animal abuse 

  • Educational or documentary coverage of animal abuse with abuse footage

Hunting

  • Hunting content featuring fleeting graphic imagery such as dead or injured animals (e.g. bloody body parts) portrayed in the content. 

War & conflict

  • Real raw footage of armed conflict (e.g. war) without educational context.
    • Raw footage of violent attacks shared without a clear intent.  

Foreign Terrorist Organizations and Drug Trade Organizations such as drug cartels 

  • Educational or documentary content on these groups even when they are not a central subject of the video. 
  • Related imagery or satirical/comedic portrayals such as jokes about terrorism. 
  • Public service announcements on the related groups.
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Edited video gameplay that primarily focuses on graphic violence; severe violence or death that shows blood; harm to minors; abuse of animals; domestic violence; graphic dead bodies in a non-educational video.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

General violence 

  • Focus on blood, guts, gore, bodily fluids (human or animal), crime scene or accident photos with little to no context.
  • Portrayals of gratuitous violence against children, even if dramatized.

Gaming

  • Edited video gameplay that primarily focuses on graphic violence
    • Focus on the display of graphic violence in dramatized settings such as “kill compilations” or compilations of graphic violence from video games or movies.

Death & tragedy

  • Dead bodies or ultra-graphic injury such as decapitations, amputee operations.

War & conflict

  • Accounts or images of shootings, explosions, executions, or bombings.
     
  • Raw footage of war casualties with graphic depictions of injury or death.

Animal violence

  • Animal violence in any context outside nature.

Animal abuse

  • Cruelty or gratuitous violence toward animals such as abuse (e.g. kicking) or human-controlled violence (e.g. forcing to go on a cockfighting). 

Law enforcement & physical altercation 

  • Graphic violence in the context of physical altercations, public demonstrations, or police brutality.

Violence in sports play 

  • Sports videos where the central subject is the display of graphic injuries.

Foreign Terrorist Organizations and Drug Trade Organizations

  • Mentions of Foreign Terrorist Organizations or Drug Trade Organizations without context or as a focal subject in videos such as:
    • Names (group/leader) or images present in title, thumbnails.
    • Recruitment of the group members.
    • Glorification or promotion of the group (e.g. artistic expression including music implying justification for the violent acts).

Harmful or dangerous acts

Situations that may endanger participants.
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None, or stunts or acts that are slightly dangerous, but performed in a professional and controlled environment where no one is seriously injured.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

General harmful or dangerous acts

  • Activities where risk is involved with no visible injuries such as:
    • Professional stunts or extreme sports such as wingsuit flying.
    • Footage of a person doing wheelies or ground-level parkour.

Fail compilations

  • Fail compilation videos without a focus on graphic injuries (e.g. walking into a glass door). 

Pranks & challenges

  • Pranks or challenges where there is perplexity, confusion, or discomfort but no risk or long-term harm is involved such as the ice bucket challenge.

Medical misinformation

  • Education or advocacy about safe practices related to medicine or health such as how to quit smoking or how to fight the flu.

Vaping & tobacco 

  • Public service announcements for preventative actions.
  • Dramatized content with focal depiction of usage.
  • Incidental appearance of vaping or smoking (e.g. walking past someone smoking). 
  • Educational or documentary content showcasing industries involving tobacco.

Definitions:

  • “Seriously injured” refers to injuries that cannot be treated without proper medical care or cannot be treated at home such as broken bones, visible dislocations, or significant amounts of blood.
  • Body modification may include things like tattoo, piercing, or medical surgery.
  • “Dramatized” refers to scripted content such as movies or fictional settings.
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Content showing but not focusing on physical harm or distress, including acts done in a non-professional, non-controlled environment.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

General harmful or dangerous acts

  • Acts involving high risk activities such as skyscraper parkour or depicting serious injury like skate slam aftermath or fail compilation of bike injuries.
  • Harmful or dangerous acts where graphic injury is presented in an educational or documentary manner. 

Pranks & challenges

  • Pranks or challenges that create extreme emotional distress such as physical altercations, abusive language and insults. These can also include threatening an individual’s life status such as layoff pranks or by emotionally evoking or threatening someone in the context of a relationship (e.g. break up pranks where one person becomes emotionally volatile, or arrest pranks against relatives, etc.).
  • Pranks involving gratuitous amounts of body fluids or graphic violence.
  • Challenges that include eating non-toxic, non-edible substances such as ingesting a glue stick or pet food. Eating edible substances that are harmful in large volumes such as the Carolina Reaper pepper, or one’s that depict a mild physical reaction. 

Vaping & tobacco

  • Product reviews of or comparison between tobacco products (e.g. vaping juice comparison).
  • Educational or documentary mention of addiction services.

Definitions:

  • “Mild physical reaction” refers to things like dry heaving, vomit inducing cough.
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Focus on accidents, pranks, or stunts that have health risks, like drinking or eating non-edibles; or discussions of trending videos that show this type of content.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

General harmful or dangerous acts

  • Glorification of harmful or dangerous acts or acts perceived to be dangerous such as a compilation of graphic fails.

Fail compilations

  • Failure compilations that include graphic harm or injury.

Pranks & challenges

  • Pranks or challenges that should not be imitated such as a challenge to drink chlorine and may result in immediate and critical harm to one’s health.
  • Pranks relating to: 
    • Suicide, death, terrorism such as fake bomb scare pranks, or threats with lethal weapons.
    • Sexually unwanted acts such as forced kissing, groping, sexual abuse, spy cams in dress room.
    • Physical harm or distress but where such distress is not the focus of the video.
    • Prolonged emotional distress of a minor such as a prank that lasts for an extended period of time leading to a child being scared or upset. This could include pranking children into believing their parents are dead.
    • Threats or advocating for physical or psychological harm against oneself or others such as laying flat between train tracks.
    • COVID-19, that promotes medically dangerous activities such as purposeful exposure to the virus or which incites panic.
  • Promoting the use of weapons to inflict harm on others.
  • Showing the consumption of substances in such quantities that it results in a graphically shocking physical reaction such as vomiting after eating a ghost pepper.
  • Challenges which, if replicated, could result in serious harm such as fire challenge or bird box challenge.
  • Promoting or advocating for harmful health or medical claims or practices: 
    • Videos that advocate for or provide instructions on non-scientifically proven medical info such as how to heal cancer at home, untrue statements about the cause, origin or spread of COVID-19.
    • Spreading myths against what is accepted as normal and regular medical protocol such as anti-vaccination. 
    • Denying that certain medical conditions exist such as HIV, COVID-19. 

Vaping & tobacco 

  • Promotes tobacco and tobacco-related products.
  • Footage of minors consuming tobacco products.

Recreational drugs content

Content related to recreational use of drugs
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None, or education, music, statements, or humorous references about drugs or drug paraphernalia that do not glorify them; drugs in a music video.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

  • Discussing drugs in an educational or documentary context such as the science of drug use.
  • Discussing drugs where the intent is not to promote or glorify drug usage such as a personal story about the opioid crisis.
  • Focus on drug busts or the drug trade within the context of news content but with no visible consumption, fabrication, or distribution.
  • Music videos with fleeting depiction of drugs.
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Content focusing on the display or effects of drug consumption; or the creation or distribution of drugs or drug paraphernalia in a comedy, documentary, news, or educational video.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

  • Dramatized content showing the consumption of recreational drugs.
  • Focus on drug fabrication or distribution in an educational or documentary context such as documentary focusing on the fabrication of home-made opioids, news reports about cannabis farms.
  • Music videos with focal depiction of drugs.
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Content showing or discussing abuse, buying, making, selling, or finding of drugs or drug paraphernalia in a graphic and detailed way.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

  • Promotion of recreational drugs.
  • Glorifying the use of recreational drugs.
  • Focussing on drug consumption (including its effects) without educational or documentary context.
  • Tips or recommendations on drug use.
  • Focus on the recreational drug industry such as cannabis coffee shops, head shops, or cannabis farming.
  • Providing how-to guides on usage, purchase, fabrication, and/or distribution of drugs such as how to find a dealer or best places to get high.

Hateful content

Content likely to offend a marginalized individual or group.
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None, or references to a marginalized group that are made in a non-hurtful manner as part of a public debate or comedic context.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

  • News content which describes a marginalized group or reports in a non-hateful way on discrimination such a group may face such as a news report on homophobia.
  • Comedic content that include jokes at the expense of marginalized groups in a non-hurtful manner as part of a public debate or comedic context such as non-hateful jokes in a standup comedy routine.
  • Artistic content that uses sensitive terminology in a non-hateful way such as popular music videos.
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Content that may be offensive to a marginalized group but is used for education, news, or a documentary.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

  • Political discourse or debate that may include offensive language but is intended to educate such as a political debate on trans rights.
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Hate or discrimination toward a protected group based on race, age, or other natural characteristics.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

  • Statements intended to disparage a protected group or imply/state its inferiority such as “all people from this country are disgusting”.
  • Promoting, glorifying, or condoning violence against others.
  • Promoting hate groups or hate group paraphernalia.
  • Content made by or in support of terrorist groups.
  • Content that promotes terrorist activity, including recruitment.
  • Content that celebrates terrorist attacks.

Firearms-related content

Showing or discussion of real or fake guns.
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None, or hunting-related content or guns shown in a safe environment like a shooting range.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

  • Footage of shooting in the course of a hunting trip in an unpopulated location such as a forest.
  • Discussions on gun legislation or the issue of gun-control.

Definitions:

  • A “safe environment” refers to locations like shooting ranges or enclosed areas that are purpose built for target practice.
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Use of guns outside a controlled environment; display of homemade, 3D-printed, or previously modified guns; use of airsoft or ball bullet (BB) guns against others without protective gear.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

  • Showing guns being used in unprepared or uncontrolled environments (e.g. on a public street outside a home, inside a building that’s not a shooting range).
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Content that shows gun creation or modification, promotes gun makers or sellers, or facilitates the sale of a gun, minors using guns without adult supervision.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

  • Guides as to how to add bump stocks to a firearm.
  • Recommendations of top gun manufacturers or firms from which to purchase firearms (e.g. “15 best gun shops”).
  • Referring users directly to a site facilitating gun sales.
  • Promotions of the sale of a firearm or component, including but not limited to:
    • Sale of a firearm-related part or component that is essential to, or enhances the functionality of a firearm including:
    • 80% finished gun-parts
    • Ammunition
    • Ammunition clips
    • Silencers
    • Ammunition belts
    • Stocks
    • Conversion kits
    • Gun-grips
    • Scopes
    • Sights
  • Videos which promote content for gun stores.
  • Videos which promote manufacturers or discount codes for gun stores.
  • Videos containing firearm-making instructions, guides, or software, or equipment for 3D printing of guns or gun parts.

Controversial issues & Sensitive events

Recent events dealing with war, death, or tragedy.
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None, or analysis of or opinion around serious and topical events not described below, such as COVID-19.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

  • Fleeting references to any of the topics or events listed below.
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Discussions of modern acts of terror, events resulting in the catastrophic loss of human life, or controversial social issues.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

  • Focus on controversial issues such as:
    • Child abuse
    • Pedophilia
    • Child marriage
    • Sexual abuse
    • Sexual harassment
    • Self-harm
    • Suicide
    • Eating disorder
    • Domestic abuse
    • Abortion
    • Bullying
  • Focus on sensitive events such as:
    • Atrocious acts or tragic events that result in the loss of human lives, such as mass shootings conducted by foreign terrorist groups or drug trade organizations 
    • Armed conflict (raw footage)
    • Terrorist acts (e.g. 9/11) 
  • Footage or images from the scene/aftermath of a sensitive event.

Definitions:

  • An event must be relatively recent if it’s going to be considered a sensitive event such as the New Zealand Mosque Shooting.
  • Focus means that a segment or potentially the entire upload is about a given topic. It also means that there is a sustained discussion. A passing reference to one of the topics listed as controversial or sensitive is not a reason for No Ads. For example, briefly acknowledging a controversial or sensitive topic (e.g. “In next week’s video we’ll be discussing declining rates of suicide.”) wouldn’t be considered focal, but a segment of a video specifically talking about such a topic would be considered focal. Focus need not be verbal. If there is an image or text that focuses on the sensitive issue, that would be considered focus as well.

Shocking content

Situations that may upset, disgust, or shock viewers

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Light or moderately shocking content which is censored or shown in context for educational, documentary, or other purposes.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

Body parts, liquids, waste

  • Body parts, liquids, or waste that is made for kids or presented in an educational, scientific, documentary, or artistic context, and where intent won’t shock.
  • Dramatized body parts, liquids, or waste where intent is to shock, mostly for entertainment purposes (like a magic trick) but where legitimate context must be given.

Medical and Cosmetic Procedures

  • Medical or cosmetic procedures that are educational, focusing on the procedure itself rather than on bodily parts, liquids, or waste.
  • Body parts, liquids, or waste that are censored or fleeting in comparison to the procedure itself.
  • Human and animal birth videos educating viewers without extra focus on body parts, fluids, or waste.

Accidents and Injuries

  • Accidents where no exposed injury is visible (such as internal tissue, bleeding wounds).
  • Accidents that do not cause real upset due to only mild or moderate impact being visible.
  • Accidents where no real distress is visible as a result of the accident.
  • Accidents in which there’s no evident injury or long-term medical care necessary.
  • Accidents and injuries that are presented in a news, documentary, or artistic context (such as a film or music video).

Animal Preparation and Eating

  • Portrayals of meat, fish in a raw or prepared-to-eat manner including cooking techniques and demonstrations for recipes (such as How to Filet a Fish or BBQ’s).
  • Portrayals of animal preparation for eating by professionals focusing on the trade and act of cutting animals.
  • Educational, documentary, scientific, or artistic portrayal of religious rituals involving animal eating where there’s no focus on gruesome or gory visuals.
  • EDSA portrayal focusing on cultural eating and traditions and not on sensationalizing the ingestion of eating animals/insects or mishandling thereof.
  • Animal parts with no presentations of discernible features of a living being (excluding fish and crustaceans).

Definitions

  • "Intent to shock" refers to the purpose of the video, which is determined by what context is given as well as the focus of elements.
  • "Dramatized" refers to scripted content (like movies or music videos) or fictional settings including animated content.
  • "Accidents" refers to unfortunate incidents typically resulting in damage or injury, including where injury itself may not be clearly visible (such as vehicle accidents).
  • "Exposed" refers to bodily parts, liquids, or waste (such as tissue or blood).
  • "Upset” refers to unsettling or surprised emotion arising as a result of a visible or reasonably assumed detrimental impact or injury.
  • "Distress" refers to the visible, audible, or perceived presentation of human suffering as a result of pain. In this case, it’s related to individuals involved in accidents and individuals undertaking or experiencing medical or cosmetic procedures (including births).
  • "Cultural eating and traditions" refers to the customs and social behavior of societies in relation to food type consumption.
  • "Sensational" in relation to exposed animal parts or animal/insect eating: to present in a manner intended to arouse curiosity or broad interest, especially through the inclusion of exaggerated, or vivid details.
  • "Mishandling" in relation to how the animal is being prepared or eaten in a brutal or savage manner.
  • "Professional context" in relation to the profession of being a butcher or fishmonger and the contexts where they cut and handle dead animals.
  • "Discernible features of a living being" includes features that confirm that the animal was/is a living being, including features such as nose, ears, mouth.
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Shocking content, like graphic images of human, or animal body parts, which is uncensored or intended to shock.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

Body parts, liquids, waste

  • Focus on real body parts, liquids, or waste where intent is to shock.
  • Dramatized presentations of bodily parts, liquids, and waste focusing on  gruesome and gory details.

Medical and Cosmetic Procedures

  • EDSA medical or cosmetic procedures focusing on exhibiting uncensored bodily, parts, fluids or waste in detail, during or after the procedure.
  • Births that contain a focus on extra bodily parts, fluids, or waste or where there’s strong apparent distress.

Accidents and Injuries

  • Accidents where there’s a strong moment of impact such that it’s likely to cause upset.
  • Accidents in which injury is visible or where long-term medical care can be reasonably assumed.
  • Accidents with strong apparent distress as a result of the accident’s impact.
  • Accident compilations.

Animal Preparation and Eating

  • Animal preparation or eating that is intended to shock.
  • Focal EDSA mishandling of unskinned or whole animals.
  • Focal discernible features of a living being (such as cooking without context).
  • Sensational presentation or ingestion (such as Sensational Mukbang, ASMR animal eating).
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Highly shocking content that’s clearly visible or audible, or where the whole purpose of the video is to shock viewers.

Some examples of content that also fall into this category:

Body parts, liquids, waste

  • Disgusting, gruesome, or gory presentations of bodily parts, fluids, or waste with little to no context.
  • Dramatized shocking elements presented with little context, solely with the intent to shock.

Medical and Cosmetic Procedures

  • Raw footage of medical or cosmetic procedures with no context or focusing on exposed body parts, fluids, or waste.
  • Raw footage of birth videos exposing bodily parts, fluids, or waste or distress, with little to no context.

Accidents and Injuries

  • Upsetting presentations of accidents and extreme injuries where exposed body parts are visible or where extreme injury can be reasonably assumed.
  • Raw footage of extreme accidents with no context.
  • Footage of children involved in accidents.
  • Compilation accident videos where the sole intent is to repeatedly shock viewers.

Animal Preparation and Eating

  • Real animal preparation and eating where the sole intent is to shock viewers, where the presentation is gruesome and gory or has no context.
  • Graphic depictions of skinning or slaughtering animals.
  • Non-EDSA portrayals of a live animal in distress as a result of being prepared to be eaten.
  • Non-EDSA animal eating where there’s a focus on discernible features of a living being.

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