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Write scripted automations with the script editor

The script editor allows you to write your own automations to create advanced Household Routines with Google Home for web or in the Google Home app. To write scripted automations, you need to know a few basics about the YAML scripting language, how to structure your script, and how to use the components that make up your script.

The script editor is currently available in Public Preview. You can access the script editor with Google Home for web or in the mobile Google Home app after you've joined Public Preview.

Learn more about creating automations with the script editor:

Additional practice for writing a scripted automation and example scripts.

Visit codelab
Important: All household members can see when these Routines run. Routines are for convenience only, not safety- or security-critical use cases. Do not create Routines that could result in injury or harm if they fail to start or stop. Routines can depend on working internet, Wi-Fi, and service availability from both Google and the third parties who manufacture the devices included in Routines. Routines may not always work, and Google is not responsible for any harm or losses incurred as a result of any failed Routines.

YAML scripting language basics

The script editor uses YAML, a flexible scripting language that allows you to enter line-by-line instructions for things you want your devices to do and when you want them to occur. These instructions are written in the form of key-value pairs.

Key-value pairs

YAML is written as a series of key-value pairs: 

name: TV on lights off

In this example, the key = name, and the value = TV on lights off

The key is essentially the keyword for an element you want to use. Each key must be unique, but the order of your keys doesn't matter. Each key-value pair starts on a new line. 

The value associated with a key can be in the form of several different data types.

Data Types

Primitives

The primitive data type includes all the basic data types supported by the script editor.

Primitive Forms Types of Values
Bool
  • true
  • false
Number Integer or decimal number
String

Plain text

String values only need quotes if they begin with [, {, ", ', or #, or the string contains a colon followed by one or two spaces. Quotation marks must match. For example, use " " or ‘ ‘, not " ‘.

Date

Month and Day. Format is MM-DD or MM/DD.

  • 09/01
  • 09-01
Time

Time can use either AM/PM format or 24H format. Seconds are optional. You can also use time relative to the sun. For example, you can use the keywords sunrise and sunset followed by a duration.

  • 12:30 am
  • 13:00:01
  • sunrise / sunset
  • sunset+30min / sunset-1hour
DateTime

Year, Month, Day, and Time of the Day.

You must include a space between the Date and the Time.

Date format is YYYY-MM-DD or YYYY/MM/DD. Time format is same as "Time" above. Time zones are not supported.

  • 2022/01/01 14:00
  • 2022-12-31 sunrise+30min
Weekday
  • MON or MONDAY
  • TUE or TUESDAY
  • WED or WEDNESDAY
  • THU or THURSDAY
  • FRI or FRIDAY
  • SAT or SATURDAY
  • SUN or SUNDAY
Duration

A period of time.

  • 30min
  • 1hour
  • 20sec
  • 1hour10min20sec

ColorHex

A six-digit hexadecimal code that represents a color. There is no leading #.

  • FFFFFF
  • B5D2A1
  • DFA100
Temperature

Temperature data. Always add C or F to denote Celsius or Fahrenheit.

  • 20.5C
  • 90F
ColorTemperature

Color temperature in Kelvin.

  • 5000K

Structures: Nested key-value pairs

The structure data type is a "block" or data structure containing multiple key-value pairs. These key-value pairs are nested under a single parent key, with each level of nesting indented by the same number of spaces or tabs to indicate hierarchy.

actions: 
  device: Light B - Living room  
  state: on

 In this example, the parent key = actions. The value for actions is 2 nested key-value pairs: 

  • Pair 1: child key = device; value = Light B - Living room
  • Pair 2: child key = state; value = on

Lists: Keys with multiple values

To include multiple values with a single key, create a list with a hyphen before each list item. A list can use either structure or primitive data type values, but not both at the same time.

weekdays:
- MONDAY
- THURSDAY

In the example, the key = weekdays, and the value = a list that includes Monday and Thursday.

Advanced structures: Combined nested pairs and lists

For more complex automations, the value can be a list containing multiple nested key-value pairs.
starters:
- type: time.schedule
  at: 10:00 am
  weekdays:
  - MONDAY
  - THURSDAY
- type: time.schedule
  at: SUNSET
  weekdays:
  - MONDAY
  - THURSDAY

In this example, the parent key = starters. This parent key's value = a list where each list item includes multiple key-value pairs.

Some types of keys require the values to be in specific formats, while other keys inherit characteristics based on a device's capabilities. Learn how specific starters, conditions, and actions are structured.

YAML language syntax

When you write scripted Routines, use these formatting concepts:

Concept Example

Colon

YAML uses a colon : followed by a space to separate a key from its value.

state: on

Indentation

Indentation indicates structure and hierarchy and defines nested key-pairs.

In the example, the parent key = metadata. The keys name and description are child keys nested under the parent key metadata. The nested keys are each indented by 2 spaces or 1 tab to indicate their hierarchy.

metadata:
  name: TV on lights off
  description: Turn off lights when TV turns on

 

Hyphen 

A hyphen followed by a space defines a list item.
weekdays:
- MONDAY
- THURSDAY

Comments

Use the pound sign # to add comments or notes to your script. Comments are ignored by the automation engine and won't affect your automation.
# This is a comment. It will be ignored.

The script editor template

When you create a new automation, the script editor provides you with an empty template to write your script, using this structure:

metadata contains the name of your automation and a description
automations defines your automation behavior
  starters defines the triggers that initiate your automation
  condition defines restrictions on when your automation should run (optional)
  actions defines the actions that occur in your automation

The template is broken down into 2 main blocks: metadata and automations. Automations is then further broken down into sections for starters, conditions, and actions.

Metadata and automations blocks

The script editor template contains two top-level parent keys, or blocks: metadata and automations.

The metadata block contains the name and description of your automation. This is only used to help you identify your automation.

metadata:
  name: TV time
  description: When TV is on, turn on lights

The automations block is the core of your automation script. This is where you define your automation's behavior using starters, conditions, and actions.

automations:
  starters:
    # e.g. Motion detected
  condition:
    # e.g. Between two times
  actions:
    # e.g. Turn on lights

To better understand how to use the script editor, visit our codelab, view example scripts, or look up how to format individual starters, conditions, and actions in the Google Home Developer Center.

Auto-complete

The script editor helps guide you through writing your script by providing auto-complete suggestions based on available starters, conditions, and actions when: 

  • Your cursor is located where there are valid options. For example, after "- type: ".
  • You type code with valid suggestions. You'll see the list of suggestions filter as you type.

You manually start auto-complete using the Ctrl+Space shortcut.

Press Enter to select a suggestion from the list. Auto-complete will fill in additional fields based on the structure you select.

Tip: You can use auto-complete to find which device states or commands are available for your device and which devices are available for a certain device state or command. 

To find which device states or commands are available for your device, when writing your script, enter the "device: " key first, and then the "type: " key. The auto-complete feature will show you a list of states or commands available for that device.

Example

starters:
- device: LED lights - Living Room
- type:

To find which devices are available for a certain device state or command, enter the "type: " key first, and then "device: " key.  The auto-complete feature will show you a list of available devices in your home that support that state or command.

Example

starters:
- type: device.state.OnOff
- device:

Starters, conditions, and actions

Automations are made up of device starters, conditions, and actions. These components define your automation's behaviors. 

Some starters, conditions, and actions require a specific type of comparison key-value pair to help complete the automation logic and let your script know what you want evaluated. The value must be a compatible data type. For example, a light's on state can be either true or false. To start the automation if the light is on, you'd use:

state: on
is: true

Below you'll find details about the different starters, conditions, and actions available. For a complete list of starters, conditions, and actions, visit the Google Home Developer Center.

Starters

The starters section of your script is where you specify what will cause your script to run. Starters are based on things your device can do or attributes that can be changed, including device states, time, and device events. For example, you may use a light bulb that has the OnOff, Brightness, and ColorSetting states. To include multiple starters, list each starter beginning with the key " - type: ". Your script must meet at least one starter condition for it to run.

Check out the complete list of supported starters.

Starter types

Assistant starters

Use an assistant.command starter to start a script when a device with Assistant hears an assistant command that begins with "Ok, Google" or "Hey, Google".
Note: If an automation is started by a voice command and there is an Assistant action in the script, the Assistant action will occur on the device that hears the voice command, even if a different device was specified in your script.
Example: Start your automation when someone says, "Ok, Google party time".
starters:
- type: assistant.command.OkGoogle
  eventData: query
  is: party time

Device event starters

Use a device.event starter to have your script start when a specific event occurs, for example when someone rings your doorbell or a sensor detects something. Note: Not all events can be supported.

Example: Start your automation when your doorbell is pressed.
starters:
- type: device.event.DoorbellPress
  device: Doorbell - Front door
Example: Start your automation when your camera detects a person.
starters:
- type: device.event.PersonDetection
  device: Camera - Backyard 

Example: Start your automation when your camera detects motion.

starters:
- type: device.event.MotionDetection
  device: Camera - Backyard

Note:

  • Camera events require a compatible Nest camera, doorbell, or display and event detection set up.
  • Some camera events may require a Nest Aware subscription or a camera to be line-powered. For example, sound detection will only work on Nest Cam (outdoor or indoor, battery) when wired.
  • You can suppress starters based on device events and device states from reoccurring for a period of time.

Device state starters

Use a device.state starter to have your automation start based on the state of a device. States are characteristics of a device, for example when the temperature of your thermostat reaches a specific temperature, if a light turns on or off, or when a supported sensor reaches a defined threshold. Note: You can suppress starters based on device events and device states from reoccurring for a period of time.
Add the state for a device state starter after "device.state". For example, to check if a device is on, you can use device.state.OnOff.
To use a device.state starter, begin with 3 keys: type, device, and state, followed by at least one comparison key-value pair.
Key Value Example
type The device state starter, beginning with device.state device.state.ArmDisarm
device Name as shown in Google Home app with room name: Device name - Room name Alarm - Front Door
state

The starter's field or state data that you want to check.

Look up the starter you want to use in the Google Home Developer Center to find "Supported Fields" or "State Data".
isArmed

Tip: To find which device states are available for your device, enter the "device: " key first and then the "type: " key in your script. Auto-complete will show you a list of states available for that device.

You can use the following comparison key-value pairs with the device.state starter:

Comparison keys Supported value types Example
is String | Number | Bool | Dynamic is: on
isNot String | Number | Bool | Dynamic isNot: cast
greaterThan
greaterThanOrEqualTo
String | Number | Bool | Dynamic greaterThan: 1
lessThan
lessThanOrEqualTo
String | Number | Bool | Dynamic lessThan: 10
suppressFor Duration suppressFor: 1hour

 Example: Start your automation if your TV volume is between 1 and 10.

starters:
- type:  device.state.Volume
  device: TV - Living room
  state:  currentVolume
  greaterThan: 1
  lessThan: 10 

Home state starters

Use home.state starter to have your script start based on if you're home or away. This can be detected with presence sensing.
Example: Start your automation when you are home.
starters:
- type: home.state.HomePresence
  state: homePresenceMode
  is: HOME

Time starters

Use a time starter to start your automation based on specific days and times. You can use the following comparison key-value pairs with the time starter:
Comparison keys Supported value types Example
before Time before: sunset
after Time after: 7:00 am
weekdays Weekday weekdays: MON

Example: Start your automation on Mondays and Tuesdays, 30 minutes after sunrise.

starters:
- type: time.schedule
  at: sunrise+30min
  weekdays:
  - MON
  - TUE

How to suppress starters

Use the comparison key suppressFor to tell your automation to ignore a starter for a period of time. For example, when your camera detects someone, announce “Someone is at the door”, and then don’t make the announcement again for the next 10 minutes even if the camera still detects someone.

Example: When someone walks through my hall in the morning for the first time, open all my blinds and then suppress this starter for the next 20 hours.

metadata:
  name: Open Blinds
  description: Open blinds in the morning after motion detected
automations:
  starters:
  - type: device.event.MotionDetection
    device: Camera - Hallway
    suppressFor: 20hours
  condition:
    type: time.between
    after: 5:00     
    before: 12:00   
  actions:     
  - type: device.command.OpenClose
    openPercent: 100
  devices:
  - Blinds1 - Living Room
  - Blinds2 - Family Room

Conditions

Conditions are optional restrictions on when your automations should run. If you include conditions, your script will only run if the conditions are met. Many starters can also be used as conditions, and they can be combined with logical operators and, or, and not to express more complex condition checks.
type: or
conditions:
- type: time.between
  before: sunrise
  after: sunset
  weekdays:
  - MON
  - TUE
- type: device.state.Volume
  device: My TV - Living Room
  state: currentVolume
  greaterThan: 1
  lessThan: 10

In this example, there is one time condition and one device.state condition. This script will run if it's between sunset and sunrise on a Monday or Tuesday, or if the TV volume is between 1 and 10.

You can use the following condition types:

Condition operators

AND condition

When you use the and condition, your script will only run if all of the child conditions are met.

Example: Start your automation if the TV is on AND the time is after 6pm.

condition:
  type: and
  conditions:
  - type: device.state.OnOff
    device: TV - Living Room
    state: on
    is: true
  - type: time.between
    after: 6:00 pm

OR condition

When you use the or condition, your script will run when any of the child conditions occur.

Example: Start your automation if the TV is on OR the time is after 6pm.

condition:
  type: or
  conditions:
  - type: device.state.OnOff
    device: TV - Living Room
    state: on
    is: true
  - type: time.between
    after: 6:00 pm

NOT condition

When you use the or condition, your script can't run if the child condition occurs.

Example: Start your automation if the time is not between 6pm and 8pm.

condition:
  type: not
  condition:
    type: time.between
    after: 6:00pm
    before: 8:00pm

Device state conditions

Use a device.state condition to limit when your script can occur based on a device's state when your script starts. Device.state conditions are similar to device.state starters, except instead of telling your script when to start, they limit the situations in which your script can occur.
Add the state for a device state condition after "device.state". For example, to check if a device is on, you can use device.state.OnOff.
To use a device.state condition, begin with 3 keys: type, device, and state, followed by at least one comparison key-value pair.
Key Value Example
type The device state condition, beginning with device.state device.state.OnOff
device Name as shown in Google Home app with room name: Device name - Room name Chromecast - Living Room
state The starter state that you want to check. Look up the device state condition you want to use in the Google Home Developer Center. state: on

Tip: To find which device states are available for your device, enter the "device: " key first and then the "type: " key in your script. Auto-complete will show you a list of states available for that device.

You can use the following comparison key-value pairs with the device.state condition:

Comparison keys Supported value types Example
is String | Number | Bool | Dynamic is: on
isNot String | Number | Bool | Dynamic isNot: cast
greaterThan
greaterThanOrEqualTo
String | Number | Bool | Dynamic greaterThan: 1
lessThan
lessThanOrEqualTo
String | Number | Bool | Dynamic lessThan: 10

Example: Start your automation if your thermostat detects a humidity level higher than 55%.

condition:
  type: device.state.TemperatureSetting
  device: My Thermostat - Living Room
  state: thermostatHumidityAmbient
  greaterThan: 55

Home state conditions

Use a home.state.HomePresence condition to limit when your script can occur based on whether someone is home or away.

Note: Before creating a script that uses the home.state.HomePresence condition, make sure you set up presence sensing in the Google Home app and that presence sensing is working as expected. Home presence can be determined by the location of your household's phones, sensors in some Nest devices, or by manually switching Home or Away in the Google Home app.

Learn more about presence sensing and home and away Routines:

You can use the following comparison key-value pairs with the home.state.HomePresence condition:
Comparison keys Supported value types Example
is String ("HOME" or "AWAY") is: away
isNot String ("HOME" or "AWAY") isNot: HOME
for Duration for: 30min
suppressFor Duration suppressFor: 1hour

Example: The home.state.HomePresence condition will start the automation if your presence is set to HOME.

condition:
  type: home.state.HomePresence
  state: homePresenceMode
  is: HOME

Time conditions

Use the time.between condition to limit when your script can occur. You can use the following comparison key-value pairs with the time.between condition:
Comparison keys Supported value types Example
before Time before: sunset
after Time after: 7:00 am
weekdays Weekday weekdays: MON

Example: Only start your automation on weekends before 10am.

condition:
  type: time.between
  before: 10am
  weekdays:
  - SAT
  - SUN

Actions

The actions section of your script is where you list what you want your devices to do. To include multiple actions, list each action beginning with the key "- type: ". Your script must have at least one action for it to run. Most actions begin with device.command.

You can use the following action types:

Assistant actions

Use the assistant.command action with your speakers or displays to have Assistant complete actions like “Turn off all lights” or “Tell me the weather.”

By using Assistant commands you can command devices by room or for your entire home without using specific device names. This can save you time as future devices added to the Home app can automatically work with this command. Assistant commands require a compatible speaker or display to run the action.

Note: If an automation is started by a voice command and there is an Assistant action in the script, the Assistant action will occur on the device that hears the voice command, even if a different device was specified in your script.

Example: Use “Turn on living room lights” to turn on all lights in the living room.
actions:
- type: assistant.command.OkGoogle
  okGoogle: Turn on living room lights  
  devices: My Speaker - Room Name 
Example: Use “Turn off all lights” to turn off all of your lights set up in your home.
actions:
- type: assistant.command.OkGoogle
  okGoogle: Turn off all lights  
  devices: My Speaker - Room Name 
Example: You can have your speakers or displays make an announcement.
actions:
- type: assistant.command.Broadcast
  devices:  
  - My Speaker 1 - Room Name
  - My Speaker 2 - Room Name
  message: It’s dinner time.
     

Assistant actions also allow you to perform custom actions like:

  • "Play Hello by Adele from YouTube Music on bedroom speaker" 
  • "Play funny cat videos from YouTube on Living Room Display"
  • "What's the weather like tomorrow?" 
  • "Tell me a joke" 
  • "Show me the driveway camera on home office display"

Note: Assistant actions that require Voice Match or personal results turned on won’t work with household automations created with the script editor.

Device actions

Use the device.command action to control or adjust a device. Each action command has its own set of characteristics and structure. You can add commands to your script by adding the command action for a device after "device.command". For example, to turn on a device, you can use device.command.OnOff. A device.command action must include the following info:
Key Value Example
type The device action, beginning with device.command device.command.OpenClose
devices Name of device as shown in Google Home app with room name: Device name - Room name. To include multiple devices, create a list. Blinds - Bedroom

Tip: To find which actions or commands are available for your device, enter the "device:" key first and then the "type:" key, auto-complete will show you a list of actions available for that device.

Many device.command actions have additional keys that specify the required input for the command. For example, device.command.ThermostatTemperatureSetpoint requires a thermostatTemperatureSetpoint key-value pair to tell the thermostat the new temperature you want it set to.

To learn more about how to use commands, look up the related action at the Google Home Developer Center and follow the structure for the action you want to use.

Example: Turn on the TV in your living room.

actions:
  type: device.command.OnOff
  devices: TV - Living room
  on: true

 Example: Turn on a light, and turn it off after 5 minutes.

actions:
- type: device.command.OnOff
  devices: Light A - Living Room
  on: true
- type: time.delay
  for: 5min
- type: device.command.OnOff
  devices: Light A - Living Room
  on: false

Notification actions

Use the home.command.Notification action to have your script send notifications to the mobile devices of home members. For example, you can get notifications when appliances connected to smart plugs turn off or go offline.

actions:
- type: home.command.Notification
  members:
  - Alex - cloudysanfrancisco@gmail.com
  - Kim - jeffersonloveshiking@gmail.com
  title: It’s movie time!
  body: Join me in the living room
 

Time actions

Use the time.delay action to have your script wait a defined amount of time between two actions in your list instead performing all actions at once. You can add multiple delays to your script; for example, you can have your script wait 10 seconds between each action.
Example: Turn on your lights, and turn them off after a  30 second delay.
actions:
- type: device.command.OnOff
  devices: 
    - Bedside Lamp - Bedroom
    - Ceiling Light - Bedroom
  on: true
- type: time.delay
  for: 30sec
- type: device.command.OnOff
  devices: 
    - Bedside Lamp - Bedroom
    - Ceiling Light - Bedroom
  on: false

Resources

Practice writing a script

To get started, we'll create a very simple, but popular automation: "Turn off the lights when the TV turns on".

Note: If you don't have a Chromecast, smart lights, or comparable devices, you can still follow along to understand the scripting process, but your script won't run at the end.

  1. Open home.google.com/automations and sign in to your account.
  2. Click Add new .
  3. Fill out the metadata information. In this script, the name = TV on lights off, and the description = Turn off lights when TV turns on. Make sure you format your script correctly.
    metadata:
      name: TV on lights off
      description: Turn off lights when TV turns on.
  4. Now we'll create the automation. Add starters by creating a new line under "starters:"  beginning with "- type: ". 
    • To create a new line, indent the line 2 spaces or press tab once after the beginning of "starters:" as shown below.
    • To include multiple starters, each starter should begin with a hyphen and a space.
      metadata:
        name:  TV on lights off
        description:  Turn off lights when TV turns on
      automations:
        starters:
        - type:
  5. Add the device.state starter. Remember, to use a device.state starter, you need 3 keys: type, device, and state, followed by at least one comparison key-value pair. The script editor will help you with the structure by providing auto-complete suggestions based on available starters, conditions, and actions. In this script:
    • Type = device.state.OnOff. This is the device's state that will be evaluated to start our automation.  
    • Device = Chromecast - Living Room. This is the name of our device as it appears in the Google Home app. 
    • State = on. On is the supported field or State data for the OnOff device state.
    • The comparison key-value pair = is: true. The value for this comparison key is a primitive data type. The script will run if the TV is on.
      metadata:
        name: TV on lights off
        description: Turn off lights when TV turns on
      automations:
        starters:
        - type: device.state.OnOff
          device: Chromecast - Living Room
          state: on
          is: true 

      For comparison, let's take a look at a similar script with a different starter. In the script below, the automation starts when the volume is between 1 and 10, rather than when the TV turns on. To make this change, we replaced the OnOff state with Volume and changed the state to currentVolume to match the new attribute. We also changed the comparison key-value pairs to two nested pairs that create a range:  greaterThan: 1 and lessThan: 10. For more examples, here is a complete list of starters you can use.

      metadata:
        name: TV on lights off
        description: Turn off lights when TV turns on
      automations:
        starters:
        - type: device.state.Volume
          device: Chromecast - Living Room
          state: currentVolume
          greaterThan: 1
          lessThan: 10
  6. Click Save to save your script at any time. When you save a script, the script editor automatically validates your script and checks for errors. An invalid script can't run.
  7. Now add an action to your script. To add actions, create a new line under "actions:" beginning with " - type".  To create a new line, indent the line two spaces past the beginning of "actions:" as shown below.
    • To include additional actions, each action should begin with a hyphen and a space.
      metadata:
        name: TV on lights off
        description: Turn off lights when TV turns on.
      automations:
        starters:
        - type: device.state.OnOff
          device: Chromecast - Living Room
          state: on
          is: true
        actions:
        - type: 
  8. To turn off our lights, we'll use the device.command action. To use the device.command action, we'll include the following info: 
    • Type = device.command.OnOff. This is the name of the command or action. Note that commands can have multiple commands nested underneath your devices, and each command has its own state. 
    • Devices = a list containing Floor Lamp - Living Room and Overhead Light - Living Room. These are the names of our lights, as they appear in the Google Home app. To include multiple lights, we listed each device on separate lines, each beginning with a hyphen.
    • The command's desired state = on: false. This line tells our lights to turn off.
      metadata:
        name: TV on lights off
        description: Turn off lights when TV turns on.
      automations:
        starters:
        - type: device.state.OnOff
          device: Chromecast - Living Room
          state: on
          is: true
        actions:
        - type: device.command.OnOff
          devices:
          - Floor Lamp - Living Room
          - Overhead Light - Living Room 
          on: false
  9. Click Save to save your script. If there are no errors, your script will automatically activate: whenever your TV turns on, your light will turn off. If you're not ready for your script to run yet, pause your script by turning Activate off.

For more practice, try changing some of your script to use different starters, data types, multiple actions, or an additional condition like time.between. You can also review example scripts and check out codelab to learn more. For detailed info regarding starters, actions, and conditions, check out the Google Home Developer Center.

Help with scripted automations

  • Find help with scripts and learn what others are working on in the Google Home Automation community.
  • For automations to work, scripts must use valid code. If an error exists, a message appears. Learn more about errors and warnings in the script editor. 
  • To validate your code, click or tap Validate in the script editor or try to save your script. Here are some common errors to look out for:
    • Make sure you use the correct device name in the format Device name - Room name. If you're not sure, check the name of your device in the Google Home app.
    • Make sure your device supports the function you want it to perform. You can also use auto-complete to find available options.
    • Make sure you include an action. Actions are required for an automation to run.
  • If the script saves, but the automation doesn't behave as expected, manually confirm that each component in your script works. For example, if you wrote a script to turn on the light and change the brightness at sunset, try completing these tasks with an assistant command to confirm that each individual function works. You can also check that:
    • Your device Is added or linked in the Google Home app.
    • Your device Is connected and online.
    • The device name, starters, conditions, and actions are written correctly. Note: Manufacturers may change device traits when they perform updates and this can cause scripts to stop working. You can use auto-complete to help update affected scripts.
    • Your script has proper indentation and formatting.
  • With Google Home for web, you can also access Automation logs  below your script to view your automation’s history and to identify potential problems. Learn more about the types of messages you see in the Automation logs.
  • Try using the script editor’s experimental generative AI feature to describe the automation you want and it will draft a script for you to review and edit.
  • Learn more about the basics of Routines and how to troubleshoot them.
  • Learn more about creating and editing scripted automations.

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