Discovery ads creative guidelines

Discovery campaigns combine audience targeting features and visually engaging formats to help you better personalize your ads within Google's feeds to inspire customer action. This article outlines the creative asset guidelines you’ll need to know to drive the best results with your Discovery campaign.

People visit the YouTube Home and Watch Next feeds, Discover, and the Gmail Promotions and Social tabs to browse and discover new content that aligns with their interests. In order to ensure ads feel both authentic and relevant to these experiences, you should provide high quality brand imagery that tells your brand’s story and showcases your products or services as attractively as possible.

Ads must follow our advertising policies

All ads must adhere to Google Ads Policy guidelines and Personalized advertising guidelines, including, but not limited to:

By creating a Discovery campaign, you are also confirming that you own all legal rights to the image (or otherwise have permission to share the image with Google) and you hereby instruct Google to publish this image on your behalf for advertising purposes.

... and provide a high-quality consumer ad experience

In addition, please ensure that your ads meet our quality guidelines and focus on providing the right messages to your customers. This includes the overall effectiveness of your ad, its aesthetic appeal, professional appearance as well as its relevance to your promotion. Ads designed to draw unwarranted attention to the eye or elicit unintentional clicks are considered low quality. Please see examples of these and related images below.

Image quality examples

Gimmicky text, provocative content, negative or disturbing themes, graphic illustrations, poorly cropped images, and "selfies" can all be considered low quality images that provide a poor consumer ad experience.

 

 

Images featuring unrealistic content or products out of context can also offer a poor user experience:

  Poor quality user experience High quality user experience
Example 1 - Background

Example 2 - Composition

Example 3 - Context

 

Poor use of call to action text or buttons can also offer a poor user experience:

  Poor quality user experience High quality user experience
Call to action button
Example of CTA 2

The sideways red triangle mimics an interactive component because it invites the user to click.

Overlaid text that does NOT mimic a clickable component is fine, even if it uses strongly action-oriented language.

Example of CTA 3

The sideways arrow along with the different-colored text makes the first part of the sentence look clickable, mimicking an interactive component.

A non-rectangular graphical overlay does NOT invite the user to click, and it does NOT look like a webpage button.
 

Example of CTA 4

The sideways arrow invites the user to click.

 

Overlaid text that does NOT mimic a clickable component is fine, even if it uses strongly action-oriented language.

Example of CTA 5

The phrase “Click here” invites the user to click, mimicking an interactive component.
 

Although the following image contains call-to-action words "Learn How", it does NOT mimic a clickable button.

Example of CTA 6

An underlined URL or text that mimics an interactive component.

A non-underlined URL does NOT invite the user to click.

Related links

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