How to upgrade URLs with cross-domain redirects

Learn about final URLs and tracking templates

What’s my final URL?

Your final URL is the page on your website that people reach when they click your ad. It doesn’t have to be the same as your display URL, but the domains (e.g. the “example.com” in “www.example.com”) must match. With Upgraded URLs, you don’t have to put any tracking information in your final URL.

What does my tracking information look like?

We’ve detected that you have one or more cross-domain redirects in your URLs. That means that once someone clicks your ad, he or she will pass through a website with a different domain before or after reaching your landing page. You might also use parameters (things like “source=google” and “ad={creative}”) in them. Those parameters record certain details about the ad into the URL once someone clicks it.

With Upgraded URLs, this tracking information will move from the destination URL to the new field called “Tracking template.”

Alert:  Please be sure you are using Google Ads Editor 12.4 or higher. Using an older version may result in the deletion of some of your previous URL and parallel tracking changes. Check which Google Ads Editor version you're using.

To further safeguard your parallel tracking changes from being deleted, some edits made in the previous AdWords experience (including those to campaigns, ad groups, keywords, ads and extensions) may be rejected. To complete these edits, switch over to the new Google Ads experience. Determine which Google Ads experience you’re using.

What's a cross-domain redirect?

If you have a cross-domain redirect set up, that means that once someone clicks your ad, he or she will pass through a website with a different domain (for example, the “example.com” in “www.example.com”) before or after reaching your landing page.

Redirects can be set up within a destination URL or your own website. Below are some examples. They’re considered “cross-domain” redirects because someone will visit different domains between clicking an ad and visiting a landing page.

Example 1

Display URL: example.com
Landing page URL: https://example-redirect.com?url=https://example.com/somepage

What happens: When someone clicks on this ad, he or she will first be directed to https://example-redirect.com/ before landing on https://example.com/somepage.

Example 2

Display URL: example.com
Landing page URL: https://example-redirect.com/12345678

What happens: When someone clicks on this ad, he or she will first be directed to https://example-redirect.com/12345678 before landing on https://example.com/somepage. The landing page is stored on https://example-redirect.com/12345678.

Example 3

Display URL: example.co.uk
Landing page URL: https://example.com

What happens: When someone clicks on this ad, he or she will first be directed to https://example.com before landing on https://example.co.uk/somepage. The server on example.com will automatically redirect visitors based on the country that they’re in.

Example 4

Display URL: example.com
Landing page URL: https://www.example.com/yourpage

What happens: When someone clicks on your ad, he or she will first be directed to https://www.example.com/yourpage, then directed to https://example-redirect.com before landing on https://www.example.com/yourotherpage. Code on your website triggers these redirects.

Our advertising policies state that an ad’s landing page must have the same domain as the display URL. With Upgraded URLs, cross-domain redirects aren’t allowed to be in the “Final URL” field, and must be set up in the “Tracking template” field.

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