Page Experience report

The Page Experience report provides a summary of the user experience of visitors to your site. Google evaluates page experience metrics for individual URLs on your site and will use them as a ranking signal for a URL in Google Search results on mobile devices. Learn more about page experience on Google.

Open Page Experience Report

The Page Experience report is currently limited to mobile URLs.

About Page Experience

Page Experience is evaluated per-URL. Currently it is only evaluated using a mobile browser (that is, the evaluation is considered only for users on mobile devices, and only searches from mobile devices are affected). The assessment, and the report, were developed to help sites create pages that provide a better user experience for their visitors.

Read our FAQs about page experience.

Page experience in Google Search is evaluated using the following criteria:

  • Core Web Vitals
    Core Web Vitals tests the speed and stability of the page loading experience for users. The Core Web Vitals report provides a rating of Good, Needs improvement, or Poor to each page. A page must have a Core Web Vitals rating of Good in order to qualify for Good page experience status. Note that there is a few days' lag in importing data from the Core Web Vitals report into the Page Experience report, and so the rating for a URL in the Page Experience report can lag slightly behind the URL's rating Core Web Vitals report. Open the Core Web Vitals report for mobile.
  • Mobile usability
    A URL must have no mobile usability errors in order to qualify for Good status in the Page Experience report. Open the Mobile Usability report.
  • Security issues
    Any security issues for a site disqualify all URLs on the site from a Good status in the Page Experience report. Open the Security Issues report.
  • HTTPS usage
    A page must be served over HTTPS to be eligible for Good page experience status. The Page Experience report doesn't consider HTTPS criteria when calculating URL status, only as a site-wide warning: if your site has a relatively high percentage of HTTP URLs, you will see a Failing warning in the Page Experience report. We don't yet have a report that shows details about HTTP vs HTTPS on your site, but here are tips on how to locate your HTTP pages, and here's a guide describing why HTTPS is important, and how to implement it on your site.
  • Ad Experience
    Ad Experience rates whether a site uses advertising techniques that are distracting, interrupting, or otherwise not conducive to a good user experience. The Ad Experience evaluation affects an entire site, not a single page. If a site is flagged as having a bad ad experience, all pages on the site are considered as having a bad page experience. Note that many sites are not tested for Ad Experience: if your site is not tested, your site is considered passing the Ad Experience test.
    The Page Experience report currently doesn't know the Ad Experience status for a site, but you can check your site's Ad Experience status yourself:
    1. If you have a URL-prefix Search Console property (your property name starts with http or https in the Search Console property selector). Open the Ad Experience report for mobile.
    2. If you have a Domain property (labeled Domain property in the property selector, and the property name does not start with http:// or https:// in the Search Console property selector), you must create an equivalent URL-prefix property in Search Console, and then open the Ad Experience report for mobile for that property. This is because Domain properties are not supported in the Ad Experience report.
    3. Choose your property from the list in the Ad Experience report to see your status. If your status is Not reviewed, your Ad Experience status is considered good in the Page Experience report.
    4. Ad Experience status changes rarely, so you do not need to check it often.

About the chart

The chart shows the following data:

  • Good URLs: Percentage of mobile URLs with Good status on the last date measured in the chart, where Good means that a URL has Good status in the Core Web Vitals report and has no mobile usability issues in the Mobile Usability report. Security issues, HTTPS, and Ad Experience are not included in this evaluation. See more about status reporting.
  • Total impressions of good URLs: The number of impressions generated by good URLs over the time period shown by the chart. Latest data for impressions may lag the daily good URL count because of differing data processing schedules.
  • Chart daily values: The percentage of URLs considered good on each given day. URLs considered "good" follow the same criteria described above for Good URLs.

⚠︎Important qualifications about the data: 

  • If your site has critical issues—security issues, HTTPS issues, or Ad Experience issues—then the number of URLs shown as Good will not be accurate. This is because the chart and chart totals do not consider critical issues, which change Good status to Bad for affected URLs. In this case, the chart will be dimmed to indicate the uncertainty about the exact count of Good or Bad URLs. However, URLs shown as Good are still reliably known as having Good status in the Core Web Vitals report (or being absent from that report) and having no mobile usability issues according to the Mobile Usability report.
  • There is a delay in importing data form the Mobile Usability report and Core Web Vitals report into the Page Experience report. Therefore, the evaluation of a specific URL in Page Experience can lag slightly behind that URL's evaluations in those other source reports.

Time lags

The source data for the Page Experience report is based on the evaluation of data from several other sources and reports: Core Web Vitals report, Mobile Usability report, and so on. These child evaluations occur on different time schedules, so the live, current state of any given URL might be different than that shown on the report. Because of this, you should look at trends in your data (getting better or not?) and the general evaluation (most of your pages are good or not) rather than using this report as an exact, real-time evaluation of a specific URL.

Missing chart or URL data

In order to appear in the Page Experience report, a URL must have data in the Core Web Vitals report. (Exception: A URL without Core Web Vitals data might appear in Page Experience if the URL group for that URL appears in Core Web Vitals).

If you see Not enough data collected instead of a chart, it means that you don't have enough data for any URLs on your site in the Core Web Vitals report.

Status criteria

The Page Experience report checks a subset of the page experience criteria applied to a URL in Google Search results. Therefore some URLs marked "good" in this report will probably not be considered good by Google Search. Here is a summary of the differences:

  Page Experience Report Google Search
Core Web Vitals Checked (some lag in results) Checked (no lag in results)
Mobile usability Checked Checked
Security issues Checked Checked
HTTPS usage Checked at the site level, not the URL level (whether site has a minimum percentage of HTTPS URLs) Checked per URL
Ad Experience Not checked Checked

 

Here are the criteria for a URL to rate as good in page experience status in Google Search:

Good Failed

All of the following are true:

  • The URL has Good status in the Core Web Vitals report
  • The URL has no mobile usability issues according to the Mobile Usability report
  • The site has no security issues.
  • The URL is served over HTTPS
  • The site has no Ad Experience issues, or the site was not evaluated for Ad Experience.

Good status will be used as a ranking signal for a URL in Google Search results on mobile devices.

At least one of the following is true:

  • The URL has Poor or Needs Improvement status, or does not appear, in the Core Web Vitals report
  • The URL has one or more mobile usability issues according to the Mobile Usability report, or the URL doesn't appear in the Mobile Usability report but appears in the Page Experience report.
  • The site is affected by one or more security issues.
  • The URL is served using HTTP, not HTTPS.
  • The site has one or more Ad Experience issues.

Find your HTTP pages

If you need to find out which URLs on your site are HTTP, rather than HTTPS, here are two methods:

  • Create a Domain property for your site. Then open up the Performance report for Search and add a filter for URLs starting with "http://". This will show you the first 1,000 HTTP URLs on your site that people are finding in Google.
  • If you can't create a Domain property for some reason, create a URL-prefix property for your HTTP address, open up the Performance report for Search, and see up to 1,000 HTTP URLs on your site that people are finding in Google.

If you think you have an equivalent HTTPS version for an HTTP URL that's appearing in Search, inspect the HTTPS URL in the Google Index to see if it's appearing in Search, and if not, why not.

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