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Download & read books offline

You can download your ebook so you can read it anywhere, even when you don't have an internet connection.

Download books to read offline on your computer

  1. Go to play.google.com.
  2. At the top right, click your profile icon.
  3. Click Library & devices and then Books.
  4. Next to the book you want to download, click More More and then Export and then Download EPUB or Download PDF.
    • If you get an ASCM file: You need to download additional software to read your book. Download and install Adobe Digital Editions.
    • If you get an EPUB file: You can read your book with a reading app like iBooks or Adobe Digital Editions.
    • If you get a PDF file: You can read your book with a PDF reader like Chrome or Acrobat Reader.

Tips:

  • If your book was originally an ASCM file, to read the EPUB or PDF, download Adobe Digital Editions at no charge.
  • Some publishers don't allow any file downloads. You can’t download rented books.
  • You can't download some large book files.

Transfer your books to your e-reader

Important: You can’t open most books on a Kindle device.

  1. Connect your e-reader to your computer.
  2. On your computer, open Adobe Digital Editions. If you don't have it yet, you can download it at no cost.
  3. Drag the book to the name of the device you want to transfer it to.

Tip: Your purchased ebook associates with a single Adobe ID. Standard device limits apply. Some books aren’t supported for download. Check the “Reading Information” section of your book’s page in the Play Store for availability.

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