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Welcome to the help center for DoubleClick Search, a platform for managing search marketing campaigns.  While the help center is available to the public, access to the DoubleClick Search product is available only to subscribing customers who are signed in. To subscribe or find out more, contact our sales team.

Hourly reporting

About hourly reporting

See how your ads perform at different times of the day, and use DS to automate your response

Are some of your ads performing better in the mornings, while others drive more conversions in the late afternoons? Do ads on mobile devices tend to perform better before rush hour each day, or after you air commercials on TV in the evenings?

You can use hourly reporting in DoubleClick Search (DS) to identify time-sensitive trends and behaviors that otherwise would go unnoticed. Once you understand how your ads perform, you can use automated rules to adjust bids at different times of the day. For example, you may want to boost mobile bid adjustments in the evenings if you notice that your position is low but impressions are higher.

Examples

For example, you can use hourly reporting to find:

  • Hourly trends during weekdays: Over the past few weeks, did a campaign see a higher conversion rate on weekday mornings or evenings?

  • Hourly trends per day: For example, compare performance of Monday mornings with Friday afternoons.

  • Performance for a specific hour on a specific day: For example, see how performance changed when a promotion/tv ad was run on a specific day.

Once you identify, analyze, and understand what's causing the trends, you can create automated rules that send email when sudden spikes occur, or that change bids or make other changes. For example, you can create an automated rule that runs in the mornings to boost bids, then create another rule that runs at noon to return bids to normal.

Ready to get started?

  1. Read important details about hourly reporting.
  2. View and download reports with hourly data.
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