SEARCHB

Returns the position at which a string is first found within text counting each double-character as 2.

Sample Usage

SEARCHB("新", "农历新年", 2)

Syntax

SEARCHB(search_for, text_to_search, [starting_at])

  • search_for - The string to look for within text_to_search.
  • text_to_search - The text to search for the first occurrence of search_for.
  • starting_at - [ OPTIONAL - 1 by default ] - The character position within text_to_search at which to start the search.

Notes

  • If search_for is not found, the #VALUE! error value is returned.
  • Ensure that search_for and text_to_search are not supplied in reverse order, or the #VALUE! error will likely be returned. The arguments are supplied in a different order than other text functions such as SPLIT and SUBSTITUTE.
  • It's recommended to use a function such as IFERROR to check for cases when there aren't matches to the search.
  • You can use the wildcard characters: question mark (?) and asterisk (*), in search_for. A question mark matches any single character; an asterisk matches any sequence of characters. If you want to find an actual question mark or asterisk, type a tilde (~) before the character, or see FINDB.
  • Use SEARCH for standard character sets, and SEARCHB for double-byte character sets such as Japanese, Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), and Korean.

See Also

SEARCH: Returns the position at which a string is first found within text, ignoring case.

REPLACE: Replaces part of a text string with a different text string.

REGEXREPLACE: Replaces part of a text string with a different text string using regular expressions.

REGEXMATCH: Whether a piece of text matches a regular expression.

SUBSTITUTE: Replaces existing text with new text in a string.

SPLIT: Divides text around a specified character or string, and puts each fragment into a separate cell in the row.

FIND: Returns the position at which a string is first found within text, case-sensitive.

FINDB: Returns the position at which a string is first found within text counting each double-character as 2.

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