Logging policies for omnibox predictions

How does the omnibox prediction feature work? If supported by your default search engine, a prediction service will predict likely web addresses and search terms based on the partial information that you have entered in the address bar. Learn more about using predictions in the address bar

Because your default search engine requests predictions as you’re typing in the address bar, it may be logging your text as search terms. The specifics of the logging behavior depend on your default search engine. For example, if you use Bing as your default search engine, the text you type in the address bar is sent to Bing (just as it is when you search on www.bing.com), and Bing's logging policies will apply.

If Google is your default search engine, then the following logging policies will apply. At Google, we keep search logs to improve our services, strengthen security, and help prevent fraud and abuse. 

The address bar prediction service is turned off

  • Collection policy: Searches are logged only after you press Enter.
  • Example: You type "flow" and pause. No partial query is logged by Google. You press Enter. Google logs "flow" as a search.

The address bar prediction service is turned on

  • Collection policy: As you type in the address bar, the text you've typed is sent to Google so predictions can be retrieved.
  • Retention policy: Partial query data is retained for two weeks, after which a randomly selected, anonymized 2% sample of the partial query data is retained in order to help improve the prediction feature. If you select a prediction from the address bar menu and press Enter, Google logs the resulting query as a search.
  • Example: You type "flow". The prediction "flowers" appears in the address bar menu. Although you have not pressed Enter, Google logs "flow" as a partial query request that is stored in accordance with the partial query logging policy. If you select the prediction "flowers" from the address bar menu, then Google logs "flowers" as a complete search.