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Saying Goodbye to YouTube’s Community Contributions feature after September 28, 2020  0 Recommended Answers 419 Replies 2327 Upvotes
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Hi everyone,

One of the ways we help creators reach a wide audience and improve accessibility for everyone on YouTube is by providing high-quality captioning and subtitle tools. We have three ways to add captions to videos: manual captions uploaded by the Creator, automatic captions provided by YouTube, and captions provided by the Community, also known as Community Contributions. 

Community Contributions lets anyone contribute translated video titles, descriptions, closed captions and subtitles. These contributions are reviewed and published by creators, or automatically published after receiving enough community reviews. 

While we hoped Community Contributions would be a wide-scale, community-driven source of quality translations for Creators, it’s rarely used and people continue to report spam and abuse.
  • Both creators and viewers have reported problems with the community contributions feature, including spam, abuse, and low quality submissions. As a result, the feature is rarely used with less than 0.001% of channels having published community captions (showing on less than 0.2% of watch time) in the last month. Instead, creators are using YouTube’s alternative captioning tools. 
We’ve decided to discontinue the Community Contributions feature across all channels after September 28, 2020. You can still use manual and automatic captions, as well as third party tools and services. 
  • No other captioning tools are going away beyond Community Contributions. You can still add your own captions and subtitles, or use YouTube’s built-in automatic captioning feature.

  • If you have contributions currently saved as drafts, these will be available for the next 60 days (until Sept 28 2020), and you have until then to publish them before they’re removed. Any already published contributions (titles, descriptions, captions, etc) will continue to show up on videos and can be managed by Creators in YouTube Studio.

  • We know many of you rely on community captions and thanks to the feedback we received, YouTube will be covering the cost of a 6 month subscription of Amara.org for all creators who have used the Community Contribution feature for at least 3 videos in the last 60 days. These creators will receive a notification on their YouTube Studio Dashboard (News Card) in the coming weeks with more information about how to sign up for the service.

  • We’ve also obtained special pricing and benefits from additional third party vendors, who can assist with caption, translation, and subtitle needs. We have a list of these partners in our Help Center
We’re committed to improving existing accessibility and caption features, as well as introducing new and better tools for creators to reach the broadest possible audience. 

Hope this heads up is helpful!
Camilla, TeamYouTube
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Very disappointed to hear this, as I am one of the (apparently few) creators who benefit greatly from community-submitted captions.

Will captions that have already been submitted by the community and published by me remain after September 28th?
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Hi Casey,

Existing Community Contributions are not going away and will continue to show up on videos. This includes titles, descriptions, captions. Creators will also be able to manage these existing contributions directly in YouTube Studio.
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What about the volunteers who have been supplying good-quality community captions to creators? We have collectively put in thousands of hours captioning videos and there is little to no recognition of that in this post. Captioning in general is a neglected feature on YouTube and this change just makes YouTube even less accessible than it already was.

After this change comes into effect, how can a volunteer contribute captions to a creator's video (other than creating them on a different site and sending them to the creator for upload)? In this week's Creator Insider video, it was mentioned that an "Editor without Revenue" permission was being created and that it would eventually be extended to captioning. Is there a timescale for that feature coming into effect (and will it be before September 28th)?

While the free Amara sub will help creators out in the short term, it will divorce creators from their existing volunteer captioners which will make it harder to reconnect after the six-month free Amara sub has ended.

Over the entire lifespan of the captioning feature, YouTube have done absolutely nothing to build any kind of community around captioning and have ignored feedback from deaf creators (especially Rikki Poynter), deaf viewers, and other captions users. This is a backwards step for YouTube, an insult to all of the volunteer captioners who care about quality, and a significant blow to accessibility for anyone who relies on captions
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Thanks for the reply. I have to add: I wonder the degree to which YouTube's lack of notifications when community-submitted captions came in crippled this feature from ever becoming more popular. The only way I found out about submissions was when I manually checked the page, or (more often) when users would contact me directly and ask me to approve their submissions. The fact that creators couldn't be notified when submissions came in was strange and must have negatively impacted adoption of the feature.
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I don't understand the rationale here. You guys already disabled community approval for captions (despite continuing to claim otherwise outside of one Twitter reply confirming it a year ago), so what is the issue with "abuse" here if captions already needed to be approved by the video uploader anyway? All this does is add a further layer of complication between a captionist and the creator.
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> These contributions are reviewed and published by creators, or automatically published after receiving enough community reviews. 

This is partially incorrect. For most of the last 12 months, the community has never been able to have their captions automatically published after receiving enough community reviews. In zero cases have my community captions been approved without the assistance of the creator.

By including this part in your sentence, you are misleading your audience (in this case, community caption contributors) into believing that was some hidden reason why their captions were never published. This is completely disingenuous and bordering on complete fraud.

In 2019, as few as 5 were required. Any additional re-publishings required slightly more up to approximately 10-12 community reviews. Ever since 2020 (and certainly towards the latter half of 2019), community reviews were disabled; pressing the "Looks good" button did nothing. This has been proven time and time again with multiple videos that friends and I have tried to get published. Yet, YouTube did nothing to tell creators or contributors that the company disabled this feature.

If you believe my hypothesis to be false, I would like to ask for hard figures on -how many- reviews are required by the community for captions to be automatically published.
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Thank you for destroying the entire english virtual youtuber community with this move. This will be a deathblow to many virtual youtubers who have large western audiences that rely on this feature, and will result in these fans forced to reupload with hardsubs they make themselves(these people often completely lack the ability to speak English and are one man shows), or add needless additional costs of inhouse subtitles. This solves no problems and adds needless worry to many channels. 

You'll force out abortions like Stadia and execute features people actually use and rely upon. Positively reprehensible.
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Could you expand on that <0.2% number a bit? 0.2% is a significant amount of time at youtube's scale. If people watch one billion hours of video a day[1], then that's two million hours of community contributions watched a day which seems like a lot.

Thanks!
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Good. Thanks for your. Asking
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 So now fan-translators are just gonna have to reupload other people's entire videos with hard-subs now?  If you're so concerned about people abusing the system why not just let channels opt into allowing community subtitles and have creators manually approve them themselves? How does this improve things in any way? It feels like you're trying to address a non-issue, it's just ridiculous. This is going to be a massive hit for Vtubers that don't livestream. And what about those with impaired hearing? It's now up to the content creator to choose if they want that particular audience to even be able to participate? Despicable.
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Thank you for ruining the Virtual Youtuber translation scene (primarily JP → EN translations).

You could have at least replaced the feature with "trusted translators". Generic third party services, besides being paid services, often do not have the necessary context to be able to properly translate many kinds of content.
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This is incredibly upsetting for those with national audiences. Shame.
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Frankly, this is crap.  Youtube features and UI change so regularly you don't give individuals and institutions enough time to learn about and incorporate the functionality into our workflows (I can rarely even find current, accurate tutorials for basic functionality).  Our college depends on our captioners being able to submit captions via community contributions, but like many colleges this is a new practice.  We just figured out a process for captioning our videos using community contributions this past summer.  We are struggling to caption all of our digital content in general, and now a critical tool is being taken away for no good reason other than that our volume of use is too small to be valued by YT.  How can our professors get third party captioning support now?  Your options are 1) pay outrageous rates to a third party provider, or 2) give out their personal login to a captioner.

Most people won't care that this is going away but for those of us who depend upon it to provide affordable captioning, this is a devastating blow to our ability to ensure the accessibility of our digital content.  I sincerely hope you'll reconsider the decision to terminate this vital functionality.
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Dear Lord, this is going to absolutely cripple any multilingual communities on here.
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A disappointing development. The percentage numbers are also misleading, with the number of channels on Youtube, 0.001% still translates to tens of thousands of channels that use and rely on community-contributed Captions. The only thing this change will achieve is making this platform less accessible for disabled people.
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why not just get rid of videos, since they're often used for spam and abuse?
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Hi,

I know be it far from us to make a decision based on what’s best for the company along with budgeting and funds, but there are entire communities with thousands of people constantly working to translate videos that other people including the creators can’t. It provides a layer of individuality and uniqueness that isn’t seen anywhere else, allowing those who are learning different languages to collaborate to make new sorts of ideas and captions that allow people overseas to get new viewers!

It’s a majority issue. It’s a thread issue, it’s a moderator issue in the way that this or any of our complaints would reach anyone higher up. It’s an announcement not a debate.

But the communities who love these don’t need any improvements on them. They just want it here even if nobody hardly ever uses them.

So many people feel as though they’re being ignored or shunned by YouTube. Have you ever been one person, or ten people trying to make a change for something you loved?

If you have been, if you’ve ever felt outnumbered or as if your opinion didn’t mater due to being such a small majority against such a big corporation, I hope you’d understand how it feels as though spending time typing this, and all our comments wish for us to see even a little spot of light.

I’ve been watching virtual you tubers and foreign accounts to help me learn and study, as well as smile and connect.

If that’s what YouTube is about... can they stay? 

Max
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This is terrible news! Half the videos I watch are not in English and I wouldn't be able to understand a thing that was going on if it weren't for community contributions of subtitles. Translations are very difficult and time-consuming to create. You can't expect the video uploaders to do all of the work, especially since the translations I've seen are for many languages, not just English. If there are volunteers willing to translate a video into another language, you should make it easier for them not harder. It opens up the world to more content people would not be able to watch otherwise.
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Hi Colin, 

Q: In this week's Creator Insider video, it was mentioned that an "Editor without Revenue" permission was being created and that it would eventually be extended to captioning. Is there a timescale for that feature coming into effect (and will it be before September 28th)?

Re: “Editor (Limited) without Revenue” permission, this role will be able to edit all parts of a creator’s content, which is more than just captions. This includes editing titles, descriptions, thumbnails, replying to comments, etc. It’s not yet available, but is in the works. It’s therefore not a perfect replacement, but we do have teams working on new and better tools for captioning needs. Unfortunately, I don’t have something more concrete to share right now in terms of details/timelines, but I’ll definitely keep everyone updated here on any future plans – you can subscribe to the thread for updates. 

Also want to take a minute to recognize all of the time that’s gone into providing these captions (THANK YOU!) and apologies for not including this recognition in the original post!
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Hi there,

I'm wondering how third party translation companies can get involved in this new update? I understand under the 'Third-party Tools & Services' link there are 4 service providers. What about translation companies that currently provide translations for numerous creators but aren't part of the list - who can we contact to become a recommended third party?

Thank you for your help!
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With the current system in place that requires the creator to individually approve community captions there shouldn't be any more capacity for abuse than the change you're describing where creators have to upload captions themselves.  As futile as it might be, I beg you to reconsider this decision.  In my experience as a person who has uploaded community subtitles (specifically translation) that were approved by the creator and helped others to view the video, my use of the system hasn't been limited by my desire to contribute subtitles, but rather that the feature is often not available on most channels (because by default if I'm not mistaken community contributions are turned off and must be manually turned on by the channel creator, which is not something many people know to do when creating a channel).  It has already been an uphill battle against the system for community contributions because as far as I've heard YouTube doesn't notify a creator when there are subtitles awaiting approval, and it is up to the community to try and contact channels through outside means in order to let them know that there are subtitles waiting to be approved.  It's no wonder that the system doesn't see overwhelming usage with how many hoops that are required to be jumped through to make it work, but having to jump through hoops is better than trying to jump through a brick wall.

Once again, I ask that YouTube reconsiders this decision.  While community subtitles may not see overwhelming usage, the portion of YouTube that does use them is greatly improved by their presence, and steps have already been put in place to prevent abusive subtitles from being approved.
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As someone who has a very global audience and typically receives translations in about 30 languages per video, this is very disappointing to hear. Your claim that "both creators and viewers have reported problems with the community contributions feature" doesn't justify removing the feature entirely since creators have always had the option to turn off community contributions if they didn't want to use it. Creators also have to manually approve the translations before they get published, so I'm not understanding the issue regarding "spam, abuse, and low quality submissions". I hope you can reconsider moving forward with this update as it is unfavorable towards multilingual, international channels. Thank you.
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This is quite possibly one of the worst decisions youtube has made recently and thats saying something. Automatic captions are incredibly unreliable, hard of hearing and deaf users will get blocked from enjoying content because not all creators can or will add subtitles and watching international content without subtitles provided by helpful translators is going to make it a lot harder to consume said international content. For example, I consume quite a lot of japanese gaming content. Am I going to be able to enjoy it to the same extent without translations? No. I absolutely wont.

This will negatively impact the youtube experience for anyone who isnt someone with unimpaired hearing that only watches videos in their mother language. A short term amara sub is not going to make up for this.

The "editor without revenue" thing is also not helpful unless you're expecting international content creators to give full editing rights to their videos to people they probably dont even know. I dont know about you, but I dont know a convenient handful of people that speaks fifteen languages fluently. This tool is literally only useful to people who already have a set editing team to begin with.

Overall, incredibly disappointing. It's sad to see that decisions like this that make the site even less accessible are being made constantly without any community input.
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*** I'm just editing this comment to say that since I've posted this, I've seen all of the feedback on automatic captions and will definitely share with the team*** 

Reminder that no other captioning options are going away, and that YouTube has automatic captions (in addition to creator-submitted captions and 3rd-party service integrations):

Have seen feedback/comments about how this change impacts accessibility and how manual translations can be time-consuming for creators, so wanted to remind folks that YouTube has a built-in automatic captioning feature that applies captions/subtitles to videos whenever possible, leveraging advanced speech recognition technology. More in our Help Center.

YouTube’s automatic captions are available in English, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. We’re continually working to improve the technology powering these captions, as well as expand to more languages. 

Both YouTube’s automatic captions and manual creator captions are used significantly more than the Community Contributions feature. While this was a hard decision to make, discontinuing this feature (that has much lower usage than other captioning tools) will allow us to focus efforts on improving existing tools and building newer/better captioning tools for everyone.
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man screw you
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So let me get this straight; Youtube is killing off a great community-driven tool that is far more effective than it's extremely biased auto-caption tool for a quick cash grab? Really showing what a horrible site Youtube has become.
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I'm sorry, but I don't think that automatic captions and translations are a real solution to this.  Maybe if you're only watching videos where there is super clear English being said, but for Japanese at least if you look at what the automatic captions say in comparison to what's actually being said it's a mess.  Even if automatic captions got twice as good as they are now for non-English languages, it still probably wouldn't be a good viewing experience, and that's discounting when there's a video using terminology, names, etc. that aren't found in a dictionary.  Automatic captions are probably never going to be able to capture an inside joke to the channel, or a wacky catch phrase.  There's just so much you're leaving behind by trying to rely on machines, and there's no real reason that you have to cut people out of the equation in this instance.
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YouTube, your auto-caption is, to put it bluntly, crap and not good enough. Frick off with this crap. We know the real reason is you're partnering with a service that'll kick you back money.
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Why did you post the exact same message twice within three minutes?
Why not just leave it in with minimal to no support? This hurts many communities and "we have automatic captions" is NOT a solution and you know it, they won't be useful for supporting content creators of a different language no matter how many years pass. (test: automatic captions editor without revenue)
You mention "newer/better captioning tools" but of course there is zero details or even hypothetical ideas of what form these might take, nothing to show you've put a thought into even conceiving of such "tools".
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This is really frustrating for those that enjoyed the community captions. We don't rely on Google's "automatic captioning" because 99% of the time it misses the mark on what was actually spoken. Why would you, as a platform, remove the option entirely, instead of allowing creators to choose whether-or-not they wanted Community Captions in the first place?
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Yes, of course the world only speaks English, Dutch, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. No other languages spoken or written beside that. God forbid if you speaks Tagalog or Bahasa or some smaller country languages. Well though luck for you, you must learn 1st world country language and no one can translate those videos for you anymore. All you can do is to use translation that rarely ever correct.

This sounds like really self centered and racist thinking in this 21st century,  thinking other country rarely use the features while most of people contributing to help their fellow language speaker to learn and make a captions for them. 

And god forbid deaf people. How dare they enjoy youtube. How dare people help them. 

What a shame Youtube. What a shame.
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Don’t even suggest that, please. YouTube’s automatic captioning is flipping awful which is why the need for well-translated community contributions, which you’re now taking away because you’re too lazy to build this into the new YT Studio. Also, these figures for removing polls and community contributions seem exaggerated, as there are MANY, MANY creators I know who use/used those features. 

Welcome to YouTube, in 2020 everyone. Even better than last year.
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Subber here, would we be able to still sub the videos if we were given access by the YouTuber themselves? Because the people I sub for actually know who subs for them and I would also like to believe that the subs greatly help them (also from the feedback they given me and other subbers).

It’d be great if special access could be given because we even have like a full volunteer team of subbers that pretty much help channels do subtitles.
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Wow. No one expected and I guess I will unsubscribe all the foreign language based channels.

or maybe I would rather change to language studies majors so I don't have to translate every single lines by using Google Translate.

Wouldn't it be so much funny to play Youtube video and record it via Translator and translate to my language? Very effective. 

Thank you so much for coming up with this great idea and I highly doubt if I use Youtube more than before.
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"Reminder about YouTube's automatic captions (and that no other captioning options are going away)!"

Are you serious? Automatic captions don't work well with anyone not speaking in a western accent or slowly. People who talk fast or have accents have words transcriber completely wrongly, and this feature doesn't work at all for translating languages.
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Hello,
I am hard of hearing and so is my brother, we heavily rely on community contributions. We only watch channels with subtitles but sadly no creator has enough free time to subtitle their own videos, so it's always the fans and subscribers that subtitle those videos.

A lot of viewers and channels will be affected by this, they will lose views and subs. There are a lot of channels I follow that use community contributions and I would have to stop watching them, as I wouldn't understand what they're saying. 

Automated captions are never accurate and most of the time they're in the wrong language (automated spanish subs for an english video) and the creator won't fix that. But the community contributions are always 99% accurate to me.

Is there anything you could do about this?
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Hello, 

I think some really important points have been raised here. I've been adding subtitles for a content creator for months now and I pride myself for my quality, time and effort, so it's going to be really heartbreaking to lose the thing I can help them with. Couldn't you, instead of getting rid of Community contributions entirely, add a feature that allows the creators to grant permission to only certain volunteers they chose to add video titles, descriptions, closed captions and subtitles? The Editor without Revenue sounds good, but it might grant more permissions than the creators would like to give. 

As a side note, I think adding notifications would have helped too, I feel bad bothering the creators to publish my submissions.

Thanks a lot for reading and please, please reconsider this decision.
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I'm so disappointed by this change. I watch so many channels that rely on community captions (foreign language channels specifically). The automatic subtitles feature only works in limited circumstances, and is in no way a suitable replacement for community-contributed captions.

Say I'm watching a video from a korean youtuber. There are two issues with using the automatic captions system here. First is that for most languages, google translate (or whatever the auto-translate tool uses) is highly inaccurate, so using automatic captioning with auto-translate to English enabled would allow me to get a general gist of the video content, but not the vast majority of what's happening in it. This is the 'ideal' scenario. What seems to happen more often is that I click on the automatic captions with the goal of auto-translating them into English, but the software detects the language of the video as Spanish instead of Korean, so both the automatic captions and the translation software are both rended utterly useless.

I just cannot fathom why anyone at YouTube thought this was a good idea. 'Sometimes abused' =/= 'never used with good intentions'. You're just telling everyone with an international audience to pay up or cut all ties with a significant portion of their fanbase. Not to mention people with hearing difficulties. Absolutely disgusting.
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Jordan, I've had the issue of auto-captions listening for a language other than what is being spoken with no way to fix that.

Every change regarding YouTube's captions has continued to harm communities that have essentially been built around them, and that's not to mention the fact that videos with stylized overlapping captions from more than 2 months ago are still broken. So not only has it gotten more difficult to do work going forward but also the past work of many has been effectively ruined with no response at all by YouTube.

Also I wonder why in the past months Community Contributions have seen little use, surely it can't be due to the change of disabling community approval and requiring channel owners to publish captions (with no notification that there are captions waiting). Do you know how difficult it has been for people to try and contact bigger channels with already flooded inboxes or how many pending captions there are never to be approved?
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I know that "some well-known creators have special audiences, and those special audiences can use subtitle software to create foreign language subtitles." In the future, sending subtitles to creators via Gmail will solve this problem.  However, the lesser-known creators have no special audience.  There were audiences who used YouTube’s built-in subtitle editor, but it was difficult to train these general audiences to turn into special audiences.  They will lose the foreign language subtitles they need.  This will result in a more unbalanced resource for creators.
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this "third party" stuff is just a smokescreen to monetize peoples' need for subtitles. this is a bad move, and axing it is the best option for all parties involved.
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Automatic captioning is INCREDIBLY unreliable. Hell, ignore the fact that it's useless when going from one language to another, even with normal captions in the same language as the one spoken it gets only a fourth of the words right! People speak in ways an AI won't be able to get right all the time, especially if they have an accent or a way of speaking that isn't normal. But even with clear voices with no accent, it still gets the words wrong half the time. This is incredibly annoying for me, as, like many others here, I require subtitles to watch certain youtubers I enjoy, and this will completely ruin that experience.
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Auto sub is very unreliable. I usually watch Japanese video and tried the auto sub & translate to English. they are completely gibberish and I couldn't understand anything. because of the Fans that translated the videos keeps me watching to the content.

they are some Fans that put their own hard sub and put in to their channel. but that is also unreliable as the creator of that video can strike that down.

Removal of fan sub also remove the creativity of putting sub. Like creative placements, different colour, different size, puns, jokes. Auto sub will be just a boring plain text.

Please do not remove it as auto sub is very unreliable. We will appreciate it if you improve the sub feature instead.
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My question is for YouTube. Disabled creators who are unable to afford third party captioning services are being penalized for this - 6 months is no way a feasible option for them. Also, auto captions does not work for creators who use sign languages because the software only transcribe spoken languages. So as a double edged swords, the creators also have undue burden to either do all the work or have someone do a SRT file to be given to creator to be uploaded manually.

This feature being removed eliminated all the extra steps and did not require third parties or extra costs. 

I know YouTube had a meeting with YT creators such as Rikki Poynter and the company still went ahead with the decision to scrap this. Why? The reason given is such a weak one because the disabled community is such a small % compared to how many creators are out there. I also know of so many hearing creators who uses this feature to incorporate other countries in their audiences. Why even justify this? This is a huge step backwards to being inclusive.
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Awful Idea.
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What a joke.

I thought the same as Evan Minsk, both percentages are unexplained. Were they calculated on videos with a significant amount of views? Even better yet, how about making this assessment on videos that have a large foreign audience?
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I am extremely disappointed to hear about this. A very large percentage of the videos I watch use community contributions.

Most of what I watch on YouTube is content that is not in my native language. Most of these content creators do not hire translators or know English themselves, instead dedicated community members work hard to translate the content. Thanks to their efforts I have been able to enjoy videos in Spanish, Korean, Chinese, Japanese, Russian, and more. This would not only delete all of their hard earned efforts, but would hurt the non-English creators that I've come to love. Many of them have a large English fan base and would lose valuable subscribers and ad revenue as a result of this change.

An estimated 1 in 20 Americans are hard of hearing. An estimated 4 in 1,000 are deaf. YouTube has an estimated 1.3 billion users. Using these estimates, that's over 70 million users who are deaf or hard of hearing. Even more outside of this have other disorders that can make it difficult to hear such as audio processing disorder or autism. That's a massive amount of people for whom this change will negatively affect their experience. 

YouTube's autocaptions often do not cut it. They don't always sync up at the right time and don't reliably match up with what a person is saying. Sometimes I need them to help understand what a person is saying. Instead of helping, they often only make it more confusing. As for creator captions, very rarely do people caption their own videos. I'd say that for as rare as community contributions are, creator captions are even rarer.

This post says you are doing this in the name of accessibility, but this is the exact opposite of an accessible solution. I am asking you to please not totally delete this system, but to instead change it. Implement a system so captions that are incorrect can more easily be fixed. Create notifications to tell creators when captions need approval. Create solutions instead of deleting the hard work and effort of translators and transcribers.
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Very sad and disappointed, but understandable as Machine Learning Translation has been progressing and it's always hard to deal with user generated content.

BUT!  I'd like to suggest a win-win proposal to Youtube:  You still allow community to contribute translations, and come up some algorithms to "rate" the submitted translations based on the existing "Auto translation", so the channel admin can have a reference about how the translated subtitles are good or bad.  After all, there are some videos in professional areas that need fine-tuned translations.  And subtitles are not just translations, they can serve as a "note" to close the gap between cultures, which I don't think NMT can achieve in the short time.

Please don't make decisions purely by numbers

Regards
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You guys are really embarrassing the international community. I really depend on those captions to watch videos from other countries:  Japan, Korea, France, etc. Now, you're gonna remove it.

I see you are giving an alternative subscription-based captioning service. But many videos strongly depend on the other videos the creator made before. How could a third-party caption service do better than a channel subscriber without the context?

Very disappointed.
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Please can you outline EXACTLY how you are going to insure just as many, if not more videos are captioned, in just as many, if not more languages? Disabled people with hearing impairments or auditory processing disorder, and people who do not speak the language of the video in question, almost always RELY at least partially on closed captioning for videos, which is often done by the community. Just because there aren't very many people with these disabilities, does NOT make it acceptable to throw them under the bus.
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Hey youtube, your built-in automatic captioning feature is not good enough to replace community contributions feature. Could you improve the automatic caption before taking out community contributions feature?
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so just fuck the disabled and the non bilingual huh...
.......
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Terrible idea 😔😔😔😔😎
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this is a horrible choice. so much content i consume (often foreign original songs or covers) rely heavily on this function to subtitle songs for english fans and vise versa. before, people were just reuploading said creator's video with subtitles which was bad because it took away from the creator. but then the community driven tools allowed this to NOT happen and made it easier to consume the content straight from the creator! as someone who has an audience around the world this is very important! your auto caption sucks mostly for the kinda stuff i watch & make, it wont caption music videos at all, its not good. its not an alternative. either you fix the issue/present an improved way of doing this OR you leave it as is until there is a solution! dont get rid of it completely.
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Someone tell me what is this?? I'm trying to find out who keep hacken me n use my information n taken money from me n slot more people.. this not right. I hope one days that to all of the one who is evils n like to hacked people stuff n fake game so some of them are taking from people ; kids  everyone they say to their stuff n use these flase report n taking their money's.. Grovement need to trace down these hastags, hacken them that not right.. I hope pray the god above me m other people's, will get ur ass.thank you
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I hope you will change your mind sooner or later. If not, you're going to make a lot of content makers lose big chunks of auditory. Auto-captions are crap. They don't work properly most of the time
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YouTube, charging disabled, deaf, or HoH people for an accessibility service is disgusting.
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This is super frustrating. People aren't just numbers.
I'm coming from a community that heavily relies on community contributions - the indie music scene of Vocaloid. A highly one-directional community of producers, usually non-proficient in english, but with a large english audience relying on community-made translations to give meaning to songs that often put a lot of emphasis on the lyrics and themes.
Creating such subtitles for some of the greatest works by my favourite producers (who do not speak english nearly good enough to provide translations themselves) is the only way I can contribute to making their amazing work more accessible.
Removing this option is in my opinion way to drastic and absolutely not necessary. I for once have never even seen spam in subtitles a single time. You've got the review system in place (which already is super annoying to existing contributors), you could add spam detection that hightens the threshold for reviews needed, and there's probably tons of better stuff you could do. Let producers decide on their policy, for once.
And the watch time percentage stat you're using to justify your means is not working in your favour. Even for music videos you don't always have the subs on, but when you need them, they add so much value. 0.2% is honestly huge. Considering most of what you watch is probably already in your main language, not subbed yet, or already subbed in-video for music content, 0.2% sounds like an aweful lot of people relying on this feature, especially considering it is, in my experience, most often used in short-form or music content.
If this is just an excuse to get rid of a feature that you don't want to bother with, then good job, you've successfully ignored all the dozens of other problems hidden in the disgusting code of your website. You could really use your developers time better than removing features that people actually need.
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Greatly disappointed with this decision. The presence of community captions has always been  the mark of quality and care in YouTube videos. I am worried for the disabled (deaf, hard of hearing, ADD, processing disorders, autistic, etc) people that rely on community captioning to connect with cultures and learn languages outside, and within their own. I am concerned that this decision represents an ableist shift in YouTube’s Values, commodifying the lifeblood of so many people’s enjoyment, and shifting the burden of accessibility to content creators who are losing their tools to be accessible. Please, please reconsider.
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Hi, I believe in open sourceness when it comes to small channels. Some small channels have enabled community contributions by default and assigning someone to have full access over channel video descriptions and editing is NOT an alternative.

That's basically saying "Today, Toyota will remove the functionality for you to open your bonnet." What will happen? People will try to jack it up anyway, people will sell "illegal" modifications to allow people to open it, or heck, just copy and re-manufacture the car with "fixes", as they always have done in china. This is alreayd a thing on youtube, people just re-upload other people's content for the sake of adding subtitles because the original author didn't allow community contributions. Sometimes the original author is happy for you to re-upload with edits as long as you credit them, but in other cases they would prefer if you just contributed captions, even if they don't know or exactly trust you as a stranger.

Kizuna Ai is one such major channel, which has a fairly decently sized English speaking audience with no official English captions, but there are a few anonymous and a few known people who help contribute to their channel, and low quality translations can go through a peer-review of sorts like wikipedia. When the "good quality" caption contributor doesn't feel like doing the job, who will do the job? You might never know, lending caption rights to another user on the new system could seriously screw over the channel with editor rights. Without peer-review support, the "official" subtitles done by an editor could be unintelligible because they may not be a fluent speaker of that language.

I'm sorry to say this, but a lot of decisions at Google products in the past half decade has really paid off, in a bad way and you guys should consider replacing or re-training the people who has the rights to make a lot of these big decisions. I can't even find content of low-traffic youtubers without searching for hours. About 40% of my search terms doesn't even come up with the stuff I want on Google anymore, and a significant portion of Youtube's lost revenue is a result of their somewhat poorly implemented and rigid content ID and copyright reporting system. Youtube went from a platform you could make a living from to a platform you can't trust financially but still use mostly for publicity. I want to see comments and video descriptions below a video on mobile but all I see are recommendations and ads unless I click on two narrow fields, it's so painful to look at and annoying for people not used to the mobile layout that I literally use an ad blocker on mobile just so the page is a little neater to view without the complete clusterf**k of useless content. Just remember if someone has to actively spend effort to learn the layout of a website to find something extremely common, you've already failed as a web designer.

There's a lot of rather pointless decisions from a consumer's point of view, and removing captions is one of them.
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Removing an accessibility feature because it's "rarely used" is extremely scummy.
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> A lot of viewers and channels will be affected by this, they will lose views and subs

Congrats, you found the point. They want to nuke channel monetization. By nixing access to channels that have become mutlilingual due to fan translation, they get to pocket more money and pay less.
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I believe that taking away the community contributions tab is a big step backwards in making videos accessible to a broader variety of viewers. This will now make it harder for members of the youtube community to effectively contribute accurate captions to content creators, unless they have the ability to communicate with them outside of youtube, which is nine times out of ten, very unlikely. 

This will create a(n even bigger) divide between deaf creators/consumers and the hearing youtube community. Alienating them by making it harder for the community to contribute captions will ultimately drive them away from youtube, and i’m assuming that’s not the outcome that you desire. If you want to keep the community of hard of hearing and deaf creators you have here on youtube, I suggest rethinking the idea to get rid of the community contributors.
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This is ridiculous and your reasons for doing it are equally stupid.

Getting rid of one of the few legitimately good features that actually incentivised working with and helping international or hard of hearing creators because "nobody used it" is a complete lie and makes no sense.
Just because it's not a feature used by literally EVERY user doesn't mean nobody used it. It's admittedly niche, but what it was used for was incredibly effective and helped international channels such as Hololive reach a wider audience.

Also, your automatic captions are a complete joke. They barely work at translating english, let alone international languages. The only reason they are "used more" is because they tend to be on by default or because It's funny just how bad and inaccurate your technology truly is.

I want to ask that you reconsider, but you bone headed selfish suits don't care. You've never cared. You like to spit lies about how you listen to the community, but all you have ever cared about are your own pockets and how to fill them up more and more by cutting corners.

Still, if you do by god knows whatever grace actually listen for once, PLEASE reconsider this change.
Even if it's not out of the goodness of your coal black hearts, I'm sure there's at least some way you can further profit off of people translating videos for free, out of the kindness of their actually real hearts, thus reaching a further audience, thus netting you more revenue, thus more money.

Otherwise, Thanks for nothing, and see you next Tuesday.
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Community captions are invaluable for people enjoying content in other languages, and the hearing impaired community. I can't tell you how often I've come across a piece of fighting game tech in japanese that I was only able to understand thanks to community captions, or a spanish speaking vlogger whos content i only got to enjoy thanks to the captions. automatically generated captions are so often riddled with grammatical errors, they tend to be indecipherable. I would have rather seen efforts be put forward to improve the feature, instead of abandoning it
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As a hard of hearing person, closed captions are a blessing. I don't know what the proportion of community vs creator/third party-made closed captions is, but what I can definitely tell you is that the automatic close-captioning is perfectly unusable as far as I've seen, since it misunderstands a large portion of most regular speech, and that's nothing compared to how lost the poor algorithm is when it comes to more outlandish words, like you'd find in video game-based videos, for example
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I am hard of hearing. I cannot watch very many videos without captions, and I relied heavily on community captions for YT. Do you plan on improving the automatic captions, at least? Those are not very good or reliable and half of the time are downright incorrect, but if you're planning on at least improving that feature, than perhaps this is not a total loss.
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Thank you for ruining the growing youtube Vocaloid community
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