Updated Terms of Service FAQs

Starting July 22, 2019, we have a new Terms of Service in the European Economic Area and Switzerland.  This update is to make the Terms of Service easier to read and understand. There’s no change to your experience on YouTube, the features you have access to, or, if you’re a monetizing creator, how you’re paid.

 

Why did you change the Terms of Service?

It’s been a while since we updated our terms, so we want to ensure they reflect the YouTube product today. We also wanted to make them more transparent and user-friendly.

What are the main changes?

We’ve provided a full summary of changes but in short:
  • Improved readability. While it’s still a legal document, we’ve done our best to make the Terms clearer and easier to understand.
  • Improved transparency and communication. We’ve added some useful links to help you navigate YouTube, including links to our policies. We’ve also included additional commitments to let you know about changes that may affect you, such as future changes to the Terms or the service.
  • Your Content. We’ve clarified the content license you grant us to make it easier to understand. We’re not asking for additional permissions and there’s no difference in how we’re using your content.
  • Our product today. We’ve made some updates to better reflect the way YouTube operates. For example, we’ve removed outdated descriptions and provided helpful details about our service with links to the Help Center.
  • Age requirements. We’ve clarified the age requirements to reflect our Google wide policies. If you’re under 18, you must always have your parent or guardian’s permission before using YouTube.

Will this affect monetization?

No, there are no changes to monetization in our new Terms of Service.

How do I accept the new Terms?

You will have the opportunity to review and accept the new Terms when you log into YouTube and visit the YouTube homepage.

What happens if I don’t accept the new Terms?

You’ll need to agree to the Terms of Service to continue using YouTube after the new Terms become effective on July 22, 2019.
If you choose to stop using YouTube, you can follow the instructions here to delete YouTube from your Google Account and download a copy of your data.

If I don’t accept the new Terms, what are my options for content or subscriptions that I’ve paid for?  

If you’ve paid for content (such as movies or TV shows) or features (such as subscription services) that are no longer available to you, you may contact our support team to request a refund. Purchases made after you have received a notice about our Terms update may not  be eligible for a refund.

If you subscribe to YouTube Premium, YouTube Music or Channel Memberships, you can go here to cancel your subscription.

By accepting the new Terms, am I being asked to consent to data processing?

This isn’t consent to data processing. It’s a contractual acceptance of the new Terms.

We haven’t made any changes to the way we treat your information. You can read about our privacy practices by reviewing the Privacy Policy and YouTube Kids Privacy Notice. As a reminder, you can always review your privacy settings and manage how your data is used by visiting your Google Account

What is a Business User?

In the new Terms of Service,  there’s an additional limitation of liability provision that applies only to Business Users, including a monetary cap on Google’s liability. This is the only difference in the Terms between Business Users and regular users (also known as consumers).

You will likely be considered a Business User if you’re using YouTube for the purpose of your trade, business, craft or profession. For example:

  • If you’re a yoga instructor who creates a yoga channel on YouTube and uploads videos of yoga lessons on a regular basis, you’d probably be considered a Business User.
  • If you're a Creator whose main source of income is monetizing videos on YouTube (or other platforms) you would also most likely be a Business User.
  • If you’re using YouTube for personal purposes such as uploading videos of family holidays or your friends doing crazy stuff, you’d probably be a consumer.

Why are these terms only in certain countries?

Right now, this update is just for countries in the European Economic Area and Switzerland. We’ll roll out similar updates globally later this year.

Does this have to do with the European Union Copyright Directive or GDPR?

No, this doesn’t have anything to do with the European Union Copyright Directive or GDPR.

What does this mean for my privacy or data?

We haven’t made any changes to the way we treat your information. You can read about our privacy practices by reviewing the Privacy Policy and YouTube Kids Privacy Notice. As a reminder, you can always review your privacy settings and manage your data and personalisation by visiting your Google Account.
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