Strike basics for content managers

When a channel receives a copyright strike, channel-level penalties are applied. Partners should avoid accumulating copyright strikes across their managed channels. Failure to do so will result in penalties applied to their content manager in addition to existing channel strike policies

How copyright strikes work for content managers

  • After 90 days, the copyright strike will expire and be removed from the channel and content owner’s total.
  • A partner strike will be removed from your Content Manager if the channel with the underlying copyright strike is removed. Adding a managed channel that has existing copyright strikes will increase your content owner’s total strike count.

Multi-channel networks (MCNs) also need to monitor suspensions for affiliate channels. If a substantial number of channels are suspended in any 90-day period, the MCN loses the ability to roll-up or add new channels.

Strike penalties

If a partner receives 10 copyright strikes across managed channels in a 90 day period, then the partner is subject to further review, the results of which may include loss of the ability to link channels, loss of the ability to upload videos, and termination of the partnership agreement. YouTube also reserves the right to evaluate and address abuse at any time, at its discretion. 

How to avoid penalties

To avoid accumulating strikes, we suggest you:

  • Use care when selecting new channels to manage. Avoid adding channels that might pose a risk to your strike total.
  • Educate the channels you manage about copyright, YouTube’s Terms of Service and Community Guidelines, and ensure they act in accordance with YouTube’s policies.
  • Ensure you maintain proper internal controls as you increase the number of channels you manage.

You can always view your partner strikes within your YouTube account. If you believe any of the associated copyright strikes are invalid, you may wish to learn more about filing counter notifications or requesting claim retractions.

Learn more about resolving copyright strikes.

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