Dispute a Content ID claim

If you get a Content ID claim on your video that you believe is wrong, you can dispute the claim. For instance, if you have all the rights to the content in your video, or think the system misidentified your video, you can file a dispute. When you dispute a Content ID claim, the copyright owner will be notified and they'll have 30 days to respond.

If you got a copyright strike, use the process described in our article about copyright strikes, instead of the process described below in this article.

Content ID Dispute Process - Copyright on YouTube

Filing a dispute

Before you dispute: Make sure you understand how fair use and the public domain work. YouTube can’t help you decide whether you should dispute a claim. If you’re not sure what to do, you may want to seek your own legal advice.

Disputes are only intended for cases where you have all the necessary rights to the content in your video. Repeated or malicious abuse of the dispute process can result in penalties against your video or channel.

If you and the claimant both choose to monetize the video, the video will still earn revenue during the dispute process. Learn how revenue is handled in Content ID disputes.

Dispute a claim

  1. Sign in to YouTube Studio.
  2. From the left menu, select Content .
  3. Find the video with the claim you want to dispute. To refine the list, click the filter bar  and select the filter Copyright claims.
  4. In the “Restrictions” column, hover over “Copyright claim” and click SEE DETAILS.
  5. Click SELECT ACTIONS and then Dispute.

What happens after you dispute

After you submit your dispute, the copyright owner has 30 days to respond. There are a few actions the copyright owner can take:

  • Release the claim: If they agree with your dispute, they can release their claim. If you were previously monetizing the video, your monetization settings will be restored automatically when all claims on your video are released.
  • Reinstate the claim: If they believe their claim is still valid, they can reinstate it. If you feel it was mistakenly reinstated, you can appeal their decision.
  • Take down your video: They can submit a copyright takedown request to remove your video from YouTube, which means you’ll get a copyright strike on your account. 
    • Note: A video can get more than one Content ID claim or takedown request, but can only get one copyright strike at a time.
  • Do nothing and let the claim expire: If the copyright owner doesn't respond within 30 days, their claim on your video will expire, and you don’t need to do anything.

If you had ads running on the claimed video, you may want to learn more about monetization during Content ID disputes. If the copyright owner selected a policy to block or track your video, the policy may not apply while the dispute is resolved.

Filing an appeal

If the copyright owner reinstates their claim and rejects your Content ID dispute, you can file an appeal.

Appeal rejected disputes

  1. Sign in to YouTube Studio.
  2. From the left menu, select Content .
  3. Find the video with the reinstated claim you want to appeal.  To refine the list, click the filter bar  and select the filter Copyright claims.
  4. In the “Restrictions” column, hover over “Copyright claim” and click SEE DETAILS.
  5. Click SELECT ACTIONS and then Appeal.

There might be restrictions that affect your ability to appeal, such as the age of your account. If you haven’t already done so, you’ll also need to verify your account. Check your channel's ability to appeal rejected disputes on your account features page.

What happens after you appeal

After you appeal a rejected dispute, the copyright owner has 30 days to respond. After you appeal, there are a few actions the copyright owner can take:

  • Do nothing and let the claim expire: If the copyright owner doesn’t respond within 30 days, then their claim on your video will expire and you don’t need to do anything.
  • Release the claim: If the copyright owner agrees with your appeal, then they can release their claim and you don’t need to do anything.
  • Request immediate removal of your video: If they believe their claim is still valid, they may issue a copyright takedown request against your video. If this happens, you’ll get a copyright strike on your account. If you still believe that you have the rights to the content, you can submit a counter notification.
    • Note: A video can get more than one Content ID claim or takedown request, but can only get one copyright strike at a time.
  • Schedule a takedown request for your video: If the copyright owner issues a scheduled copyright takedown request, you can cancel your appeal within 7 days. By canceling, you’ll prevent the takedown and you won’t get a copyright strike. The Content ID claim will remain active on your video. Learn more about the difference between copyright takedowns and Content ID claims.

Cancel an appeal

If you change your mind, you can cancel your appeal after you’ve submitted it. To cancel an appeal:

  1. Sign in to YouTube Studio.
  2. From the left menu, select Content .
  3. Find the video with the claim you appealed. To refine the list, click the filter bar  and select the filter Copyright claims.
  4. In the “Restrictions” column, hover over “Copyright claim” and click SEE DETAILS.
  5. Click SELECT ACTIONS and then Cancel appeal.

Keep in mind that once you cancel an appeal, the claim can't be appealed again.


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