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Devices incompatible with Google Wifi

Although most devices are compatible with Google Wifi, there are a few that aren’t. Usually, this is because they lack the hardware or software supported by Google Wifi. See below for a list of incompatible devices.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us. We’ll do our best to help.

WPA and WEP devices

Google Wifi only supports devices with WPA2 + PSK, which is the most popular method of securing your network. Older devices that only have WPA or WEP encryption (like old printers) will not be able to connect to your Wifi points.

We do not support older protocols because they have been deemed unsecure by the Wi-Fi Alliance, the security research community and industry experts. Google Wifi keeps you safe, and WPA2 is one of the many ways we ensure that.

Workaround: Upgrade the device's Wi-Fi hardware (e.g. You can upgrade an old laptop’s Wi-Fi card). If the Wi-Fi hardware cannot be upgraded, the device may need to be replaced with a newer version that supports the newer, secure protocols.

SkyBell

Unfortunately, SkyBell cannot connect to your Google Wifi network. This is because Google Wifi creates a single network that uses both 2.4 and 5GHz bands. SkyBell only connects to 2.4GHz networks. When there is a single network spanning both bands, SkyBell is unable to connect to the 2.4GHz network. Learn more about Google Wifi’s bands.

Workaround: Unfortunately, there is no workaround at this time.

Circle (incompatible with OnHub devices only)

Circle uses a technique called ARP spoofing, which isn’t supported by OnHub or part of the ARP standard. Circle is compatible with Google Wifi devices.

What’s ARP spoofing? It’s a technique that lets a device intercept and inspect the internet traffic traveling between your router and your connected devices (like a computer, smartphone or tablet).

Here’s how it works: Circle discovers the MAC and IP addresses of the personal devices on your network. It impersonates (or “spoofs”) the router by assuming its MAC address. It also pretends to be your phone or computer by using their IP addresses. Circle then inspects your internet traffic and either grants or denies access to certain devices.

However, unauthorized devices can also use ARP spoofing to compromise your home network.

Workaround: Unfortunately, there is no workaround at this time.

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