/webmasters/community?hl=en
/webmasters/community?hl=en
6/19/12
Original Poster
Phil Payne

rel="nofollow"

I've still got an issue with this.

Apart from its automated use in bulletin board/forum software - which is a given - what reason can there possibly be to hand-code it on a specific link?

It's like cooking someone an omelette and pissing on it.
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All Replies (28)
ShopSafe
6/20/12
ShopSafe
It has a purpose for an advertising link, ie where an advertising banner or inducement text links to a landing page on the advertiser's site. Without the rule, advertisers would be able to buy their link profile.
webado
6/20/12
webado
I tend to use it for links to mega star sites  - I figure they don't need my link juice ;)

Joking aside, I have a site (2 actually: one English and one French) and we have sponsors who donate prizes for a competition (some big companies like Sears and a  TV station, but mostly small companies), whose ads appear on every page of the site (maybe 15-20 on the English site and again the same on the French one). Those link all use rel="nofollow".  You can say they are for traffic.

However on one page of the site (where we present the various prizes) their sponsorship is discussed in detail. Those links do not have rel="nofollow".  You can say these are relevant.

I felt it was appropriate to do it this way. I like to think it makes a difference.
Lysis
6/20/12
Lysis
>>  It's like cooking someone an omelette and pissing on it.

LOL I never nofollow links, but I don't post links just to post links.

The latest Google curb stomp has hit people who obviously bought links. When a real link is dropped, how many people actually just post the link or take the time to make sure it's got certain phrases in the anchor text? Real links don't have anchor text like that, but a real link could have the topic surrounding it with the link drop. These dumb spammers are just putting a huge target on their back with the anchor text BS, and I think that is part of the quality signal alerting Google.

For nofollow, I just think it's a hack to fix the issue when a site owner realizes he F's up and wants to actually take the time to clean up reciprocal links. Or lets say affiliate stuff like Amazon links which are so easily caught.
Panda_Effects
6/20/12
Panda_Effects
"lets say affiliate stuff like Amazon links which are so easily caught"

Let's see, Google used to be an affiliate of Amazon in their early days as a way to make income.  One person said that two people from Amazon are on Google's stock board.  Google favors big brand names which Amazon is.

Who is really at fault here?  Google could have started addressing issues years ago yet did not.  Amazon wanted all those affiliates to flood the internet and did not stop them from doing what was against Google polices.

Who are the real spammers?  Not that others should have done those, but again how they were taught by Amazon etc.
Panda_Effects
6/20/12
Panda_Effects
rel="nofollow"

Concept
Matt Cutts (Google, Inc)
Jason Shellen (Blogger/Google)

zihara
6/20/12
zihara
Pre-Penguin, my WMT account showed me a couple hundred incoming links from Wikipedia (none that I placed - Wiki software tracks everyone and everything and that's a problem I don't need, especially as I'm an erstwhile "editor" and have donated/CCA-shared (I don't know how many hundreds of) photos over the years). Everyone knows Wikipedia automatically nofollows all links but that presence in WMT said to me that the Googlebot followed the links and perhaps gave some amount of rank-juice based on the relevance of what was on both sides of the link.

Post-Penguin, every one of those Wikipedia links is gone from my WMT list. Post-Penguin, Wikipedia has also seen a huge upsurge in linkspamming. The links to me are still in place on Wikipedia but I'm fully expecting nearly all non-"official" links to be disappeared from Wikipedia soon.

As far as Google goes, it looks like a complete and utter wipe of nearly everything in terms of referring backlinks, legitimate or not. I do still see a number of not "nofollow" links incoming from .gov, .mil and .edu sites but that number is down also. However, the vast majority of backlinks still registered in my WMT account are from crap sites, most of which I've never heard of.

So, as usual in these things, it looks like the Google nuclear strikes have done almost equal damage head-on and collaterally. In some respects, it looks like they demoted virtually the entire web with only a few sites not hit in some way. And, of course, like the cockroaches in a nuclear blast situation, many crap sites have survived and are thriving really nicely.
Lysis
6/20/12
Lysis
>>  As far as Google goes, it looks like a complete and utter wipe of nearly everything in terms of referring backlinks, legitimate or not.

LOL You know how people complained that Google should get rid of PR? I kinda wonder if that's what has been done along with links not counting all that much. I think they still count, but I think they have more clearly defined a quality link from a non-quality one. My forum spam went way down right after Panda, but dumb forums like BHW keep spreading crap that the way to get out of Penguin is to xrumer more damn links, so now I'm back up to where I was. I've completely blocked the IP range for Russia, the Ukraine, Sweden and India now.
fathom
6/21/12
fathom
Constructively... NOT doing something isn't a prefect position to offer advice on it either.
 
By default... you can only say "I really do not know".
 
I did start a reference over here for nofollow validity
 
 
I do have a predetermined position on this but I all for disproving myself first.

On Wednesday, June 20, 2012 11:22:49 AM UTC-3, Lysis wrote:
>>  It's like cooking someone an omelette and pissing on it.

 
LOL I never nofollow links, but I don't post links just to post links.

The latest Google curb stomp has hit people who obviously bought links. When a real link is dropped, how many people actually just post the link or take the time to make sure it's got certain phrases in the anchor text? Real links don't have anchor text like that, but a real link could have the topic surrounding it with the link drop. These dumb spammers are just putting a huge target on their back with the anchor text BS, and I think that is part of the quality signal alerting Google.

For nofollow, I just think it's a hack to fix the issue when a site owner realizes he F's up and wants to actually take the time to clean up reciprocal links. Or lets say affiliate stuff like Amazon links which are so easily caught.
fathom
6/21/12
fathom
I try to look at links from this position:
 
ALL "LINKS" are for patrons on that specific page... no matter where you are or what your wares are ALL links are for the viewing PATRONS only.
 
In that context all links should be rel="nofollow" on every domain UNLESS the domain owner themselves are providing some critique or criteria for the reason patrons MUST LEAVE their domain. This the inherent risk of offering a link - right? You are intentionally trying to force patrons or users away from you.
 
A perfect plan for a domain that has no patrons or users which is the first layer of shady motives.
 
The sense of value to our website patrons has gotten lost in the desire to rank better (or to take a bribe - some form of compensation to offset the loss of patrons. If the link IS ONLY FOR PATRONS the nofollow should not be an issue to anyone.
 
IF THE LINK IS FOR SOME OTHER BENEFIT THAT IS WHY IT MUST BE NOFOLLOW... or along with your alternative conpensation for offering the link is the risk risk of being devalued by Google.

On Tuesday, June 19, 2012 12:47:30 PM UTC-3, Phil Payne wrote:
I've still got an issue with this.

Apart from its automated use in bulletin board/forum software - which is a given - what reason can there possibly be to hand-code it on a specific link?

It's like cooking someone an omelette and pissing on it.
zihara
6/21/12
zihara
What gets me in WMT is the list has been emptied but when I go to places where I know there were links, they're still there. So has the network not caught up with itself? Is it sending itself conflicting signals? Is it rebuilding the list from scratch after a total dump, using different criteria this time around? And then there's the real kicker: virtually all the links I miss most in that list were purely reward for me having done an excellent job and some complete and utter stranger somewhere (usually in a position of some respectable authority) re/commending me for it. Google seems to have thrown that baby well out with the bath water... Perhaps in time it will recover, perhaps not.

Other than some of the ads I get served from Google, I've never blocked anything... but I don't run any forums or other UGC-type operation either. I like my stuff completely locked down.
17 MORE
fathom
6/27/12
fathom
You misunderstand the concept completely.
 
There are many different reasons for one webpage to link to another webpage... and not all are acceptable reasons to pass PageRank.

On Tuesday, June 26, 2012 5:22:18 PM UTC-3, TransCanada Rentals wrote:
I agree.  I've always felt that placing nofollow on any links within your site, including links to external references, makes no sense.

If you feel the need to add nofollow to a link because it might not be considered trustworthy, then why are you linking to that site/page in the first place?
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