/webmasters/community?hl=en
/webmasters/community?hl=en
7/23/14
Original Poster
CW Research

Which Font leads to maximum User Interaction

I've read the FAQs and searched the help center. 

I am currently doing a piece on the types of fonts that people use for Maximum User Interaction.
Different fonts lead to different subconsious feelings, which might lead to a change in the user perception.
I have the following Fonts to compare.

Arial 
Calibri
Copperplate
Tahoma
Georgia
Verdana
Lucida Console
Times New Roman
Comic Sans

Which one of these do you think would fare better than the others in terms of reader interaction?
Note. Attached a sample of each of the styles for your perusal.

Community content may not be verified or up-to-date. Learn more.
All Replies (3)
Chris Hunt
7/23/14
Chris Hunt
If there were one font that provided "maximum user interaction," everybody would use it and there wouldn't be any need for any others. It's not as simple as that.
 
Provided your font is easily readable, which all of the above are with the exception of Copperplate (an all-caps font isn't really suitable for blocks of body text. Use it for titles instead) and Lucida Console (monospaced font useful for computer code, but not for regular body text), what matters is that the message sent by the font matches the content of the text. Fonts convey different values, broadly:
 
Serif fonts (Georgia, Times New Roman): Traditional, Formal
Sans Serif fonts (Arial, Calibri, Tahoma, Verdana): Modern, Efficient
Script fonts (Comic Sans): Informal, Personal
 
So if I were creating a site for a museum, I'd lean towards serif fonts; for a technology company, sans serif; for a toy company, script. A choice of font that conflicts with the subject sends conflicting or unhelpful messages to the reader. So a lawyer's site set in Comic Sans, or a nusery's in Times are likely to work less well than when the font choices are the other way round.
 
 
7/23/14
Original Poster
CW Research
Thanks Chris for such an insightful answer,

'So if I were creating a site for a museum, I'd lean towards serif fonts; for a technology company, sans serif; for a toy company, script.'
The line cleared up another question efficiently,



The question however, is narrowed down to this
'What among the following modern and efficient fonts would suit better; Arial, Calibri, Tahoma, Verdana?'

This question is not based on readability or the content as the font styles are similar. It is based on the overall look and feel of a paragraph.
What do you think Chris which one looks better to you?

Chris Hunt
7/23/14
Chris Hunt
> which one looks better to you?
 
Well, that's the nub of it, ultimately it comes down to a personal preference for one font over another, rather than an objective choice. For what it's worth, my preferred choice from that list would be Calibri, though I might up the size a little. But really you need to get some actual content, some actual design elements - colours, graphics, etc. - try different things and see what works.
 
 
> if I were creating a site for a museum, I'd lean towards serif fonts; for a technology company, sans serif; for a toy company, script
 
Re-reading that, it seems like I'm disparaging the non sans-serif fonts, that's not my intention. All types of font (no pun intended) have positive values associated with them, it's just a matter of picking the one that best reinforces the message you're hoping to send.
 
Suppose you're doing something for a bank. Your choices of font and message might be:
 
Serif - We are a safe and dependable place to put your money
Sans-Serif - We will manage your money efficiently
Script - We will deal with you like a real person, rather than a faceless institution
 
All of those are positive messages, it's just a matter of picking the one that best fits your particular business.
 
Some more random notes:
 
Some research suggests that (for body text) on paper serif fonts are easier to read than san-serif. On screen, sans-serif can be easier to read than serif.
 
It can make a pleasing contrast to use serif for headings and sans for body, or vice-versa.
 
My (current) favorite among my own sites is about a bad 19th century poet, so I chose to use not only a serif font, but a really old fashioned one that could have come from a Victorian book. I've accessorized it with other design elements that really do come from a Victorian book - a typefounders catalogue. More info here: http://www.mcgonagall-online.org.uk/news/welcome-thrice-welcome
Were these replies helpful?
How can we improve them?
 
This question is locked and replying has been disabled. Still have questions? Ask the Help Community.

Badges

Some community members might have badges that indicate their identity or level of participation in a community.

 
Expert - Google Employee — Googler guides and community managers
 
Expert - Community Specialist — Google partners who share their expertise
 
Expert - Gold — Trusted members who are knowledgeable and active contributors
 
Expert - Platinum — Seasoned members who contribute beyond providing help through mentoring, creating content, and more
 
Expert - Alumni — Past members who are no longer active, but were previously recognized for their helpfulness
 
Expert - Silver — New members who are developing their product knowledge
Community content may not be verified or up-to-date. Learn more.

Levels

Member levels indicate a user's level of participation in a forum. The greater the participation, the higher the level. Everyone starts at level 1 and can rise to level 10. These activities can increase your level in a forum:

  • Post an answer.
  • Having your answer selected as the best answer.
  • Having your post rated as helpful.
  • Vote up a post.
  • Correctly mark a topic or post as abuse.

Having a post marked and removed as abuse will slow a user's advance in levels.

View profile in forum?

To view this member's profile, you need to leave the current Help page.

Report abuse in forum?

This comment originated in the Google Product Forum. To report abuse, you need to leave the current Help page.

Reply in forum?

This comment originated in the Google Product Forum. To reply, you need to leave the current Help page.