Rich snippets - Organizations

New! schema.org lets you mark up a much wider range of item types on your pages, using a vocabulary that Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo! can all understand. Find out more. (Google still supports your existing rich snippets markup, though.)

About organization information

Organization information (for example, details about a business such as a restaurant or attraction) that is marked up in the body of a web page can help Google understand location information in reviews or events. It can also be displayed on a Place Page—a web page that organizes all relevant information about a place.

In addition to the schema.org/Organization type, Google supports any of its sub-types, such as schema.org/Attorney.

Properties

Each organization can have a number of different properties, such as its name, address, URL, and phone number. You can use RDFa, microdata or microformats markup to label these properties.

Google recognizes the following organization properties. In general, you can use the same schema.org property name in both RDFa and Microdata. In several cases where the RDFa/Microdata and microformats property names differ, the microformats property name appears in parentheses. Properties in bold are required for Google Rich Snippets.

Property Description
name(fn/org) The name of the business. If you use microformats, you should use both fn and org, and ensure that these have the same value.
url Link to the organization home page.
address (adr) The location of the business, described as a separate PostalAddress entity which can have properties including streetAddress, addressLocality, addressRegion, postalCode, and addressCountry. (In microformats these are named street-address, locality, region, postal-code, and country-name.)
telephone (tel) The telephone number of the business or organization.
location (geo) The geolocation of an Organization (or Event). Typically used with latitude and longitude properties; examples below for details.
logo URL of an image for the logo of the business or organization.

Marking up content

The following HTML code describes the restaurant L'Amourita Pizza.

<div>
   L'Amourita Pizza
   Located at 123 Main St, Albuquerque, NM.
   <img alt="logo" src="http://www.example.com/logo.png" />
   Phone: 206-555-1234
   <a href="http://pizza.example.com">http://pizza.example.com</a>
</div>

The following sections describe how to mark up this content using RDFa, Microdata or microformats.

Microdata (recommended)

Here is the same HTML content marked up with Microdata. Previous versions of this documentation used the data-vocabulary.org scheme; we now recommend schema.org as it offers a larger vocabulary and wider compatibility.

<div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Organization"> 
   <span itemprop="name">L'Amourita Pizza</span> 
   Located at 
   <div itemprop="address" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/PostalAddress">
      <span itemprop="streetAddress">123 Main St</span>,
      <span itemprop="addressLocality">Albuquerque</span>,
      <span itemprop="addressRegion">NM</span>.
   </div>
  <img itemprop="logo" src="http://www.example.com/logo.png" />
   Phone: <span itemprop="telephone">206-555-1234</span>
   <a href="http://pizza.example.com/" itemprop="url">http://pizza.example.com</a>
</div>	
	

Here's how this sample works:

  • On the first line, <itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Organization"> indicates that the HTML enclosed in the <div> represents an item. <itemscope> indicates that the content of the <div> describes an item, and itemtype="http://schema.org/Organization" indicates that the item is a member of the Organization type defined at schema.org.
  • The sample describes properties of the organization, such as its name, address, and phone number. To label organization properties, each element containing one of these properties (such as <div> or <span>) is assigned an itemprop attribute indicating a property; for example, <span itemprop="telephone">.
  • A property can consist of another item (in other words, an item can include other items). For example, the organization information above includes an address (itemtype="http://www.schema.org/PostalAddress") with the properties streetAddress, addressLocality, and addressRegion.
  • Microdata was designed as part of HTML5. If you are publishing in an XML-compatible variant of HTML, you can write itemscope="" to preserve XML syntax.

Non-visible content

It can be useful to provide search engines with precise location information, even if you don't want that information to be visible to the reader of your page. For example, providing the latitude and longitude of a venue can help Google ensure that it is correctly mapped.

Consider this example:

<div itemprop="location">
  <span itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/Place">
    <div itemprop="geo">
      <span itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/GeoCoordinates">
        <span property="latitude" content="37.4149"></span>
        <span property=”longitude" content="-122.078"></span>
      </span>
    </div>
  </span>
</div>

In this case, the content attributes indicate that the rich snippets parser should use their values to find the latitude and longitude of the business.

RDFa

Here is the same HTML content marked up with RDFa. Previous versions of this documentation used the data-vocabulary.org scheme; we now recommend schema.org as it offers a larger vocabulary and wider compatibility.

<div vocab="http://schema.org/" typeof="Organization"> 
   <span property="name">L'Amourita Pizza</span> 
   Located at 
   <div property="address" typeof="PostalAddress">
      <span property="streetAddress">123 Main St</span>,
      <span property="addressLocality">Albuquerque</span>,
      <span property="addressRegion">NM</span>.
   </div>
  <img property="logo" src="http://www.example.com/logo.png" />
   Phone: <span property="telephone">206-555-1234</span>
   <a href="http://pizza.example.com/" property="url">http://pizza.example.com</a>
</div>

Here's how the sample works:

  • The example begins with a schema declaration using vocab. This indicates the schema where the vocabulary (a list of entity types and their associated properties) is specified. You can use the vocab="http://schema.org/" namespace declaration any time you are marking up pages for people, review, or place data. Be sure to use a trailing slash (vocab="http://schema.org/").
  • Also on the first line, typeof="Organization" indicates that the marked-up content represents a business or organization.
  • Each property of the organization (such as the name and the region) is labeled using property (<span property="name">).
  • We want to include the restaurant address information (typeof="PostalAddress") in the typeof="Organization" entity. Here, we use property to indicate a relationship between L'Amourita Pizza (the Organization entity) and the address (a PostalAddress entity). Then, we describe the address using several textual properties: streetAddress, addressLocality and addressRegion.
  • To indicate a URL, we can again use property, like this: <a href="http://pizza.example.com" property="url">http://pizza.example.com</a>. You can also use rel to describe relationships between two entities—in this case, a business entity and a web page entity—but for simplicity, RDFa allows you to always use a property attribute.

Non-visible content

It can be useful to provide search engines with precise location information, even if you don't want that information to be visible to the reader of your page. For example, providing the latitude and longitude of a venue can help Google ensure that it is correctly mapped.

Consider this example:

  <div property="location">
  <span typeof="Place">
     <span property="latitude" content="37.4149"></span>
     <span property="longitude" content="-122.078"></span>
  </span>
 </div>
 
In this case, the content attributes indicate that the rich snippets parser should use their values to find the latitude and longitude of the business.
Microformats

Here is the same HTML content marked up with the hCard microformat. (The hCard microformat is used to mark up contact information for both people and organizations.)

<div class="vcard">
   <span class="fn org">L'Amourita Pizza</span> 
   Located at 
     <div class="adr"> 
        <span class="street-address">123 Main St</span>, <span class="locality">Albuquerque</span>, <span class="region">NM</span>.
     </div>   
   <img class="logo" src="http://www.example.com/logo.png" alt="logo" />
   Phone: <span class="tel">206-555-1234</span>
   <a href="http://pizza.example.com/" class="url">http://pizza.example.com</a> 
</div>

Here's how the sample works:

  • In the first line, class="vcard" indicates that the HTML enclosed in the <div> is contact information, in this case contact information for a restaurant.

    (The microformat used to describe contact information is called hCard and is referred to in HTML as vcard. This isn't a typo.)

  • In the second line, class="fn org" indicates that the code describes a business rather than a person.
  • The sample describes properties of the organization, such as its name, URL, and address. To label properties about the organization described by the vcard, each element containing one of these properties (such as <span> or <div>) is assigned a class attribute indicating that property.
  • Properties can contain other properties. In the example above, the property adr describes the address of the restaurant, and includes the subproperties street-address, locality, and region.
  • This sample also contains examples of the microformats value class pattern. Except in special circumstances (for example, when marking the best possible rating for review sites that don't use a 5-point rating scale), Google does not display content that is not visible to the user. However, the example above demonstrates an exception for geo information. See below for more details.

Non-visible content

It can be useful to provide search engines with precise location information, even if you don't want that information to be visible to the reader of your page. For example, providing the latitude and longitude of a venue can help Google ensure that it is correctly mapped.

Consider this example:

<span class="geo">
   <span class="latitude">
      <span class="value-title" title="37.774929" ></span>
   </span>
   <span class="longitude">
      <span class="value-title" title="-122.419416"></span>
   </span>
</span>

By including the detailed geo information inside the block labeled with class="geo", you indicate that the rich snippets parser should use the value in the title attribute to find the specific latitude and longitude of the business.