Updated issue categorization in Search Console

Warnings have (largely) gone away

Quick summary

Google is running an experiment on a selected group of properties. In properties affected by this experiment, the URLs or items in the report are no longer grouped at the top level by three or more status categories (for example: Valid, Warning, and Error), but are instead grouped into two broad statuses reflecting whether they are invalid or not (where invalid means that there is a report-specific critical issue in the page or item, and not invalid means that the item might still contain warnings, but has no critical issues). The implications and exact terms for the valid and invalid states varies by report type.

Overview

Users have told us that they are confused by the "warning" status when applied to a URL or item: does a warning mean that the page or item can or can't appear on Google?

In response, we are grouping the top-level item (a rich result for the rich result reports, a page or URL for the other reports) into two groups: pages or items with critical issues are labeled something like invalid; pages or items without critical issues are labeled something like valid. We think this new grouping will make it easier to see quickly which issues affect your site's appearance on Google, in order to help you prioritize your fixes.

Individual issues are still classified as error, warning, or good, though those concepts are now typically implied through use of color and icon rather than a text label.

This experiment is applied to a small percentage of Search Console properties. All users of a property in the experiment will see the changes described here.

The following reports are affected by this experiment:

Alert messages

Note that any terminology changes will not be used in any automated alert messages that we send during the experiment. These messages will continue to use the older terminology (error/warning/valid).

Report details

Core Web Vitals

Core Web Vitals does not change the page classification from Poor, Need improvement, and Good, but it now groups pages into two tables: one table for Poor or Need improvement pages, and one table for Good pages.

The table below the chart lists all issues with status Poor or Need improvement.

To see a table of Good pages, click View data about usable pages below the summary chart.

Mobile Usability

Mobile usability never had any warning-level issues, so you won't see any changes in the chart except that the categories are now Not usable and Usable

The table below the chart lists all pages with issues that prevent them from being considered usable on mobile devices.

To see a table of usable pages, click View data about usable pages below the summary chart.

AMP report

The first table below the chart shows AMP pages that are affected by critical issues that may prevent them from appearing on Google.

The second table below the chart shows non-critical issues that affect your AMP pages.

Individual AMP pages can be affected by multiple issues in either, or both, tables.

To see a table of good pages, click View data about valid AMP pages below the summary chart.

Rich result reports

The first table below the chart shows rich results that are affected by critical issues that prevent them from appearing on Google.

The second table below the chart shows rich results with non-critical issues that, if fixed, could improve the appearance of the rich result.

Individual items can be affected by multiple issues in either, or both, tables.

To see a table of valid items, click View data about valid items below the summary chart.

URL Inspection

In the URL Inspection report, the top level verdict for a URL will be one of the following three categories (exact wording will vary):

URL is on Google - The URL has no critical errors for any tested component that will prevent the URL from being on Google. The URL might have non-critical errors for categories such as warnings in structured data on the page (but not critical errors).

URL is on Google, but has issues - The URL has a critical error that will affect an aspect of the page on Google, but the page can still appear on Google. For example a critical error in a structured data item that might prevent that structured data from appearing on Google, but the page itself can appear on Google, or an error in mobile usability that doesn't prevent the page from appearing on Google.

URL is not on Google - The URL has a critical error that prevents the URL itself from being indexed. For example, Not available (404) or blocked by a noindex tag.

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