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Set up your website with Project Shield

 

Before you get started, read what you need to set up Project Shield to make setup as smooth as possible. 

Have a bare domain? If visitors reach your website by visiting your domain without the www (such as http://mydomain.com), you have a bare domain. Follow these steps to set up a bare domain.

Have a site with SSL? If visitors reach your website by visiting your domain using https: (such as https://www.mydomain.com), you have a site with Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). Follow these steps to set up a site with SSL.

1   Add the domain and subdomains to protect

If it's your first time setting up Project Shield, open your Project Shield email invite and click Set up Project Shield to start setup.

If you've already clicked on your invite, go to Project Shield, or visit g.co/shield, and log in to start setup.

Add the domain you want to protect

During the setup flow, you’ll add the domain of your website, such as mydomain.com or example.org. 

When you enter the domain, don’t put anything in front of it, such as “www” or “http://." Use just the domain, such as mydomain.com. 

The “www” is automatically added for you as your first subdomain.

If visitors reach your website by visiting your domain without the www (such as http://mydomain.com), you have a bare domain. Follow these steps to set up a bare domain.

Add subdomains

Your website may have subdomains within your domain, such as blog.mydomain.com or news.mydomain.com, that you also want to protect. 

Add one subdomain at a time. In this example, the subdomains are “blog” and “news."

2   Verify your website ownership

Project Shield works with Google Search Console to verify that you own the website you want to set up.

I’m already registered with Google Search Console

You may have previously registered with Google Search Console and verified ownership of your website. 

Check if the email address you used with Google Search Console matches the email you are using for Project Shield.

If the emails match, you should be able to click Verify Ownership in Project Shield setup.

If the emails do not match, go to Google Search Console and add the email you’re using with Project Shield as a Verified Owner on Search Console

After you add that email, click Verify Ownership in Project Shield setup.

I haven’t registered with Google Search Console

If you haven’t used Google’s Search Console before, follow these steps to add your website and verify your site ownership.

Once you’ve successfully verified your website in Search Console, click Verify Ownership in the Project Shield setup flow.

3  Tell us your website server address

Your website server address tells us where to locate your website content. You can either share a static IP address (in the format 000.000.000.000) or a hidden host name (in the format subdomain.mydomain.com).

Learn more about whether to use a static IP address or a hidden host name.

4  Turn on Project Shield by updating your DNS records

To turn on Project Shield, you’ll change your Domain Name System (DNS) records to point your traffic to Project Shield servers.

When this happens, Project Shield will filter out harmful traffic and pass safe traffic to your website server. 

Log in to your DNS records

Your DNS records may be accessible from your web hosting site, your domain registrar, or DNS hosting site. 

If you’re having trouble, follow this guide to find your DNS records.

Edit your DNS records to point your domain to Project Shield

For SSL websites:

Edit your A record in your DNS records to point your domain at the unique IP address given to you at the end of the Project Shield setup process.

For bare domain websites:

Edit your A record in your DNS records to point your domain to Project Shield’s IP address given to you at the end of the Project Shield setup process. 

For all other websites:

Create a new CNAME record so that your subdomain points to Project Shield’s host name provided to you at the end of the Project Shield setup process. 

For each subdomain you added, create a CNAME record

For each subdomain added to Project Shield, create a CNAME record that points the subdomain to Project Shield’s host name.

For example, for the subdomain blog.mydomain.com, create a CNAME record for “blog” that points to Project Shield’s host name.

5  Check your website status

DNS changes usually take 1-2 hours to take effect, but can take up to 48 hours. DNS records affect servers worldwide, so there can be a delay in fully updating DNS record changes. Your site should remain up and running while the change is happening. 

Check the Site Detail page on Project Shield

Check your Site Detail page for your site status.

  1. Log in to Project Shield, or visit g.co/shield.
  2. On the left menu, click My sites.
  3. Click your website to see Site Details.
  4. Read the status of your site at the top of the Site Details Page. If it reads, “Your site is actively proxying through Project Shield," you’re successfully set up.

If you see another status, such as “There's more to do” or “Something's not right," follow these troubleshooting steps.

Check external sites

You can do additional checks to see if your DNS changes have taken effect.  

You can do the “dig” command in a terminal window to see where your website is pointed.

Or look up your domain to see if your A record or CNAME record is pointed at Project Shield.

6  Set up firewall rules for Project Shield's IP range 

We recommend you set up firewall rules to allow only Project Shield's traffic to reach your website server.

Firewalls can be set up through your software or hardware, and are used to filter what type of traffic is allowed to reach your server.

Follow these steps for the IP range for Project Shield to use when setting up firewall rules.

 

Having some trouble setting up Shield? Take a look at our setup troubleshooting guide, or contact us.

Glossary

What’s an A record?

An A record points your domain to the physical IP address of the server hosting your content. 

Editing your existing A record will point your traffic to Project Shield’s servers. 

What’s a CNAME record?

A CNAME record creates an alias to point traffic from your subdomain, such as “www," to a different host name, such as anotherhost.mydomain.com. 

You’ll create a CNAME record so that your website, like www.mydomain.com, will point to Project Shield’s servers.

 

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