Pay an invoice

If your method of payment for a Google product or service is to make payments to Google based on invoices received from us, you'll likely need to regularly make payments against those invoices.

Even if there are no open invoices due, you can follow this process to pay invoices to free up some of your credit. Or you might pay an overdue invoice to reactivate a service that has been closed due to non-payment.

To pay an invoice:

  1. Follow the steps in this article to access and view your invoices.
  2. Follow the instructions at the bottom of each invoice to make a payment.

Note:

  • Credit card payments are not accepted, and checks can take longer to process than wire transfers.
  • We cannot accept an advance payment if the invoice has not yet been generated.

Invoice payment not showing as paid

If you have already paid your balance, and the Google service is still suspended:

  1. Check to see if the payment has been deducted from your bank account. Depending upon how you paid, it can take a few days for your payment to be processed.
  2. Check that there aren't other outstanding invoices.
  3. If your payment has left your bank account, and you have no other outstanding invoices, email collections@google.com and provide:
    • Your payments profile ID (a 12-digit number listed on the cover page of each invoice)
    • The name of the Google product for which service has been suspended
    • Invoice numbers and amounts paid
    • Proof of payment

You'll typically receive a response within two business days.

Proof of payment

To establish proof of payment for wire transfers, you’ll need to provide a bank confirmation showing:

  • Payee details (payee bank account number and name)
  • Payer's name
  • Payment effective date (This cannot be a date in the future.)
  • Amount paid
  • Bank transaction or confirmation code
  • Payment status (This must indicate that the transaction has been executed; any status not confirming a completed payment cannot be accepted.)

To establish proof of payment for check payments, you’ll need your tracking number or FedEx number and a copy of the check showing:

  • Payee details
  • Payer’s name
  • Payment date (This cannot be a date in the future.)
  • Amount paid
  • Check number

Important: A screen shot from an internal accounts payable system (such as SAP, Oracle, or SAGE) will only be considered valid proof of payment if it includes all the details listed above for wire transfers.

Was this article helpful?
How can we improve it?