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What does each source label (e.g., “blog”) mean?

Source labels are a set of predefined, generally understood terms that describe the content of your news site and serve as hints to Google News to help classify and show your content. We acknowledge the difficulty in characterizing different types of content in the rapidly changing publishing landscape, but we also hope to provide useful ways of helping users select what they want to read.

While viewing our record of your source details in the Google News Publisher Center, select all tags that apply to the content on your site. Keep in mind that we will use this information to assign visible labels to some of your content.

Please review closely: note that incorrectly removing tags (e.g., removing a "subscription" label if you are a subscription site) could affect your sites' inclusion status in Google News.

Paid subscription

Apply this label to your publication if you require a paid subscription to access content. This will add a (subscription) label to your site when it appears in Google News. We do this so users can choose whether or not to access content that may require payment.

Also, we've worked with many subscription sites to allow Google users to access some content for free; one of these subscription options may be right for your site.

Free registration

Apply this label to your publication if you require free registration to access content. This will add a (registration) label to your site when it appears in Google News. We do this so users can choose whether or not to access content that may require registration.

Press release

Apply this label to your publication if you distribute press releases from different sources and organizations. This will add a (press release) label to your site when it appears in Google News. We do this so users know if they're about to view a press release from a distributor or public institution before clicking on an article.

Opinion content

Apply this label to your publication if you primarily publish opinion content. Sources that have identified themselves as opinion will appear with the label (Opinion) next to their publication name.

User-generated content

Apply this label to your publication if you primarily publish newsworthy user-generated content, which has already gone through a formal editorial review process on your site.

Blog

Apply this label to your publication if your publication is a blog. Blogs typically identify themselves as such and adhere to standard blog formatting by displaying regular entries in order from newest to oldest. In many instances, blog posts contain more opinion content. Sources that have identified themselves as a blog will appear with the label (blog) next to their publication name.

Satire

Apply this label to your publication if you primarily publish satirical content. To offer a diversity of opinions and content Google News does contain some satire, often humorous or hyperbolic stories with the intention of social commentary. We identify these types of articles with the label (satire), so that users will know when they're reading a satirical article

Fact Check

Google News may apply this label to your content if you publish stories with fact-checking content that's indicated by schema.org ClaimReview markup, especially round-up stories that contain multiple fact-check analyses within a single article. The (fact-checking) label helps users find fact-checking content in major stories.

When determining whether to use this tag for your article, consider whether that article meets the following criteria, which we consider characteristics of fact-checking sites:

  • Discrete claims and checks must be easily identified in the body of fact-check articles. Readers should be able to understand what was checked, and what conclusions were reached.
  • Analysis must be transparent about sources and methods, with citations and references to primary sources.
  • The organization must be nonpartisan, with transparent funding and affiliations. It should examine a range of claims in its topic area, instead of targeting a single person or entity.
  • Article titles must indicate that a claim is being reviewed, state the conclusions reached, or simply frame that the article’s contents consist of fact checking.

Please note, that if we find sites not following those criteria for the ClaimReview markup, we may, at our discretion, either ignore that site's markup or remove the site from Google News.

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