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6/26/11
Original Poster
bedofstars

Can't change password back to what it originally was

About 10 minutes ago I changed my password so that I could allow my dad to briefly log into my Youtube  account without giving him my actual password, however now when I try to change it back to what my password was before I get the error message "Please specify a different password." Is there any way I can simply change it back to my old password now? There was never a problem with it in the past and I would have never changed it in the first place if I knew I wasn't going to be able to go back to the old password.

Thanks so much in advance.


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All Replies (42)
bkc56
6/26/11
bkc56
Google has made the password rules more strict over time.  They don't force you to change your password, but if you ever do they will enforce the new rules which can prevent you from using an older password again.  There's no way around that.
Google user
6/30/11
Google user
I've just had the same issue.

This is an absolutely stupid ruling. If you are confident that no-one has your password then you should be able to change it back to what you had. This will only encourage people to share their REAL password for lack of being bothered to think up a new one. Well done Google, you just made things potentially unsafe in doing this. It might make logical sense, but logical doesn't always mean its the right approach when dealing with people.

People are having to create loads of unique passwords for all sorts of different sites and it gets very confusing. sometimes when we share lives with people it can be necessary to change a password so that trusted people can access something. I have to do it on my website to sometimes allow a designer in or a programmer, but then change it back when the task is complete.

I had to do the same with my bank and choose a new password and it's dreadful. Especially as it has to have mix of upper and lower case and a number yadda yadda yadda.... ridiculous!! You find ways to remind yourself how to remember a password and then you have to change it.

Google - you are very clever, but WE are not all computers here. Please reverse this decision as it is inconvenient. 
bkc56
6/30/11
bkc56
It's really not THAT hard to come up with a good base password, then attach a number or letter prefix/suffix to it based on the account or web-site it's used on.

If you password is something like:  6yhn&UJM (type it out, it's not that bad).  Then Amazon is am6yhn&UJM.  Ebay is eb6yhn&UJM.  Gmail is gm6yhn&UJM.  Etc.

It's just not that big of a deal to create a unique secure password.  The risk is if anyone figures out your pattern, then you can be in trouble.  But there are refinements you can make for that too.
frank.renaut
6/30/11
frank.renaut
I could not agree more with the fat that that decision is stupid and, above anything, should be left to the user if (s)he wants to use a password used earlier or not!

I hae been facing the same issue and find this rule absolutely awful!
Google user
7/1/11
Google user
bkc56 - You seem to be missing the point.

So you make a system that works like the one you suggested, which does semm like a good one. Now Gmail says, 'Make a new password just for Gmail because we say so'. It throws your formula right out the window.

Also understand that I use over 30 websites, so remebering which ones are fussy buggers about passwords and which aren't (when I only use some on a monthly basis or less), It becomes a bit of a chore.
bkc56
7/1/11
bkc56
It throws your formula right out the window.

Yes, it's a pain, but you you make a new better formula and start updating sites.

But in reality, the most important thing is to make sure your e-mail account has a unique password not shared with any other account.  While it's not advised, you can do sharing in other accounts, but not for your Gmail account.
Google user
7/1/11
Google user
Well I think I was fairly justified to do so. I needed to let my IT guy in to link up Gmail with my domain mail. It's something I know nothing about how to do and have no desire to learn as other people enjoy doing that kind of work. So it made sense that he had access to both so that he could locate the necessary instructions and then set it up for me.

I agree with having letters and numbers etc, but not that you can't use a password that you've used before. if you have told it to no one then you have the confidence that it is secure. Trust me, having worked for a large social network, I know that the minute you start over complicating things for people, they leave your service. Not everyone is a clever or apt as you or I.

You have to build things for stupid people if they are to be aimed at the masses.
bkc56
7/1/11
bkc56
I don't believe there's anything wrong with using an old password *IF* it meets the current password strength restrictions.  If it doesn't you will be forced to select a stronger password.
kaaynull
7/4/11
kaaynull
I'm in the same situation as bedofstars - lent my YT account to someone for API testing (better this than creating a fake account that would just sit and clutter the server and mess with statistics) and changed the pass for the time.
Now I can't reuse my very good, secure yet well-memorized pass, and have yet another bloody thing to remember.

@bkc56: "you make a new better formula and start updating sites" - i suppose so, but in effect, google forces you to change the pass on all of those sites if you follow some pattern.
bento8
7/5/11
bento8
@google pl revert back this password policy. there may be reasons someone may need to change password temporarily, but revert back to the original later.
31 MORE
dlwiii
9/19/11
dlwiii
I also agree that this is a terrible policy!  I lost my super secret password, so requested a reset, then found it again, and want to set my password back to the super-secret one.  Please Google - let us make dumb mistakes by using lame passwords!  Don't try to nanny us into making stupid passwords due to your policies!
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