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1/1/13
Original Poster
Mithalogica

The "dot" address question in Gmail

Yes, the "dot" problem persists. I have been getting loads of e-mails for another person with a similar address to my other gmail account, the only difference being the "dot." Furthermore, I know that other person has access to at least some of them or has had access at some point, because some of these messages are from accounts which I never created (e.g. Ustream) but which require verification to set up. So someone put in my e-mail, got the verification, and was able to verify it in order to open the account.

There is no way this could have happened had the other person not had access to the messages going to the "non-dot" address. 
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All Replies (10)
bkc56
1/1/13
bkc56
Yes, the "dot" problem persists.

In the sense that people continue to use the wrong e-mail address when signing up to thing or giving it out to people, yes, you are correct it still exists.  If you mean that people can create multiple accounts with the same name (differing only by dots), no, it does not exist.

...but which require verification to set up.

Not all sites require verification.  Those that do sometimes have alternative ways to verify.  And just because someone signed up, doesn't mean he's able to use the account (if you receive the verification e-mail).

The bottom line is un-changed.  There are not two accounts with the same name and no one is getting e-mail that hasn't been sent specifically to their account.
ConnorWilliams
1/1/13
ConnorWilliams
I disagree. The reason I find myself on these forums for the first time is that someone used MY Gmail email address as their Apple ID. It also happens to be my Apple ID.
 
I got the verification email from Apple, and obviously did NOT verify. However, I then got a chain of emails from Apple about account purchases,etc. I've spent all morning resetting passwords and doing everything I can to make both accounts secure.
 
I should say - this is only the latest in a long line of issues such as this, with my Gmail address.
 
Being an Apple user, I know verification is required, and I know on set-up you need to verify from your Apple ID account. Somehow, this person managed to use my email address to do this.
 
I'm not saying this is deliberate. I'm saying there is a bug in the software somewhere. This issue has plagued me on and off for a few years now, and I'm really frustrated that Google just ignores it, or states "not possible". It is possible, I assure you, because it has happened to me. I'm a software engineer, so stating "it's not possible" really frustrates me. I am all too aware that software bugs occur.
 
So, instead of a collective burying of heads in sand, it would be great if Google could actively investigate the issue, and resolve what must be a bug somewhere. Multiple people have reported this problem over the years. Occam's razor tells us that it is likely there is a problem - ignoring it won't make it go away.
bkennelly
1/1/13
bkennelly
On Tuesday, January 1, 2013 7:41:10 AM UTC-7, ConnorWilliams wrote:

and resolve what must be a bug somewhere. Multiple people have reported this problem over the years. Occam's razor tells us that it is likely there is a problem - ignoring it won't make it go away.

In every single case reported, and followed up, it has turned out to be human error, not a software bug.  People are entering addresses they mistakenly believe to be their own.  Occam's razor tells us that it is far more likely that your case is similar. 

On the other hand, if you can come up with evidence, other than "mail addressed to my account got delivered to my account", Google would definitely look at it.
alexacutioner
1/2/13
alexacutioner
I've recently seen an influx of emails addressed to me but clearly intended for someone else, they are registration emails for services and websites.  I tracked this person back through their Pinterest account (I kept getting the emails intended for them about their friends' activity) and managed to trace it back to the person on Facebook.  Now, it appears to me that she DOES NOT KNOW she is using my email address when she is trying to sign up for things.  I get Twitter account verification emails and click the link "I did not sign up for this."  I do the same on others and reply to companies that don't have that feature that I did not sign up and to remove me from their accounts.

My issue is that I have NO WAY to notify this person that they are constantly entering the wrong email address everywhere.  I have followed Facebook Help procedures to report that they are using my email address, but I can't tell if that has done anything.  Facebook does not respond to Help messages or email issues.  I have turned down TWO Twitter account setup attempts.  You would think this person might stop for a second and realize that when these services tell her she can't sign up with the email address she's trying to sign up with, that she might reconsider checking that she's using her own address.  I never verified my email address a second time on Facebook so I don't know how she got it on there in the first place.  I've tried sending her a message directly through Facebook, but since we're not friends and have never spoken before, it goes to her "Other" box and she'll probably never see it.  It is getting incredibly annoying because the services seem ill-equipped to deal with someone claiming an alternate version of my email address, they don't seem to understand the dot has no bearing on the owner of the email address, and think they are separate addresses.  What's more, while I can't contact this person directly, she continues to sign up for new services with my email address, and should I ever want to use the website she's trying to sign up for, I might have problems because she's listed my email address as her own.

If it was once or twice over the course of a year, I would understand user error, a typo.  Unfortunately, this is many times a month and the other person seems totally oblivious to the fact they aren't getting the emails they are signing up for, that they constantly have trouble logging into their accounts where they've used my address and I decline the verification, that they don't know their own email address.
1/3/13
Original Poster
Mithalogica
I think this is wishful thinking on Google's part, TBH. When I signed up for my first Gmail, I tired to get the non-dot version, but was told it was taken. I was, however, able to get the same exact name with a dot (as in "ravenr" was taken, but "raven.r" was available. EVERY time I get something not intended for me, it is the non-dot version. Every. Single. Time. And yes, some of these are from sites that I know require verification, and I have int he past gotten the "click this link to verify your e-mail address," and then later gotten a "thank you for verifying your email address" message, when I have not signed up for, nor verified anything.

You can insist this is not happening all you like, but it is, and one would think the sheer volume of complaints on this would actually convince Google that there is a real problem here.

After failing to be taken seriously on this issue, I will be closing the account - there is not other way, it seems to be certain my info is secure, since Google's position seems to be "nothing to see, move along."
bkc56
1/3/13
bkc56
If you're positive someone else has your e-mail address, then try to get in touch with them through some of the information you have received.  Often when people are getting e-mail intended for someone else they will get phone numbers, alternate e-mail addresses, snail-mail addresses, something that will allow them to contact the other person.

Once you can establish contact, we can get the facts.  And if you can get proof of a duplicate account, we can take that to Google.
wdurham
1/3/13
wdurham
Sorry, alexacutioner, but there is no way that Gmail - or any other service - can legislate against utter stupidity on the part of a Gmail user. 

And if this other person is repeatedly signing up for services using your address instead of their own (which is probably similar, with the addition of a middle initial or a number that they have now forgotten) and repeatedly gets no emails, newsletters, information etc etc from those websites, then utter stupidity is what you are looking at.

In fact, if you were to look, you would probably find that person here on the Forum complaining that evil Gmail is blocking all their mails from these accounts they are signing up for....

Unless the truth suddenly dawns on this person that they are using someone else's address and not their own, and that's why they get no messages from the places they are signing up to, there is virtually nothing you can do about it other than what you have so far tried. The messages you are receiving are addressed to you and so they are delivered to you. 

It's a nuisance, but there is no remedy other than finding this other person and persuading them to use their own email address instead of yours. 
alexacutioner
1/3/13
alexacutioner
I don't expect Gmail to have any way to backtrack the registration emails to the stupid person using my email address, but in general companies and services are not sending out any of that sensitive information in their confirmation emails anymore.  I remember they used to send an email that listed your username and your password, but not anymore.  I've tried contacting her through Facebook but her basic information is locked down so I can't see any alternate email address and she probably won't see the message I sent.  I wanted to try contacting her through the Twitter account, but we'd have to follow each other for me to send a direct message.  Companies are making it very easy to block others from contacting you, but it seems they are not doing so much to make sure you are using the right information when you sign up.  I've opened help tickets with Pinterest to have them remove her account or put a hold on it until she removes my email address, but they marked the ticket resolved without having done anything.  I still get emails intended for her from Pinterest.  I wrote them again complaining it was clearly not resolved, but I haven't heard anything back from them.  They seem uninterested in preventing people from using false contact information, even when the real person complains that there is a problem.

What strikes me is that I don't get emails from her friends or family.  Just registration and website emails.  So it seems that she has a real email address she uses for important people, and she's dumping all these sign ups to an account she doesn't know isn't hers.  If I was getting personal emails to her, it would be very simple to write them back and say it's not the right address, but it hasn't happened.
icantchooseone
1/3/13
icantchooseone
What strikes me is that I don't get emails from her friends or family

exactly - because they have her real email address saved as a contact - BUT when she gives it out manually she enters yours

look at this thread /mail/forum/AAAAK7un8RU2mwznZ-8Qos/discussion
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