Getting Started Guide

Define and build your website's inventory

This article walks you through how to define the advertising opportunities, or inventory, on your website and how to build out that inventory in DFP Small Business.




Ad units

Imagine printing a hard copy of your home page and cutting out all of the ads. Each empty space is an opportunity to advertise. DFP Small Business defines each space, or similar spaces appearing throughout your website, as an ad unit.

Ad units can be reused across different web pages, reducing the need to create unique ad units for every single ad space on your website. You can use custom criteria to further distinguish between individual ad spaces instead.



Ad tags

An ad unit defined within DFP Small Business doesn't do anything until you link it with your website using an ad tag. When a user views a page on your website, the ad tag, which is just a snippet of code, makes a call to DFP Small Business and fetches an ad for display.

The latest version of DFP Small Business ad tags supports SSL, asynchronous rendering, and has a single request architecture for faster and more secure page loads. (Learn more about the new Google Publisher tags)




Placements

Your website might include handful or a couple hundred of ad units. It would prove tedious, to say the least, to have to sell individual ad units to advertisers, so the next step is to group logically associated ad units into placements. A placement is a group of related ad units that might interest advertisers.

Each bucket represents a placement; the first related
to sports and the second defined by ad size.

Imagine your site is structured like a traditional newspaper with sections for sports, finance and weather.

  • Sports placement: You might define a placement that includes all ad units from your sports section, a placement that would likely interest an advertiser promoting athletic shoes, for example.
  • Banner placement: You might also choose to define a placement that associates all 728x90 banner ad units on your website. A different advertiser might wish to promote a new soft drink and would find a run of website banner placement ideal for their needs.

You can choose to organise your placements any way you want, but your choice should reflect how you intend to sell your inventory. Different ways to organise placements include:

  • All leaderboard ad units across your entire website
  • All leaderboard ad units across your sports section
  • All ad units in the sports section of your website



Example 1: Traditional newspaper website

The table linked below shows how you might structure your inventory. The "Ad units" column on the left lists all of the ad units on your site. The "Placements" column on the right lists the same ad units but organised into one placement that contains all leaderboards across your site, another placement that contains only sports leaderboards and a third placement that contains all sports ad units (whether leaderboards or not):

Table 1: Inventory structure of traditional newspaper website

Example 2: New and used cars website

Imagine your site is a new and used car portal with sections for buying, selling and reviewing vehicles. Advertisers can sponsor your site by buying a partner package. Targeting above the fold is also important to you.

In the table linked below, the "Ad units" column on the left lists all of the ad units on your site. The "Placements" column on the right lists the same ad units but organised into one placement that contains all leaderboards on your site that are above the fold, another placement that contains only medium rectangles and a third placement that contains only partner-sponsored ad units:

Table 2: Inventory structure of a new and used car website

Example 3: Multiple websites/ad network

Imagine that you own multiple websites and that you are an ad network with multiple partners that you share your ad tags with. Each of your websites and partners have their own unique set of ad units. There is a common skyscraper ad space that you frequently traffic RON (run-of-network) ads to.

In the table linked below, the "Ad units" column on the left lists all of your ad units. The "Placements" column on the right lists the same ad units but organised into placements according to the size of the ad units and where they are placed on the web page:

Table 3: Inventory structure of multiple websites / ad network



Building your inventory

Now that you've defined your inventory, it's time to build it out in DFP Small Business by following the steps below:

  1. Create an ad unit
  2. Generate ad tags
  3. Create a placement