Why does my blog redirect to a country-specific URL? (ccTLD)

Q: Why am I seeing a URL change?
A: The website address of a blog you're reading may redirect to a country-specific domain. For example, if you're in Australia and viewing [blogname].blogspot.com, you might be redirected to [blogname].blogspot.com.au. The country-specific domain should correspond to the country where you're currently located.

Q: Why is this happening?
A: We are doing this to provide more support for managing content locally. If we receive a removal request that violates local law, that content may no longer be available to readers on local domains where those laws apply. This update is in line with our approach to free expression and controversial content, which hasn’t changed.

Q: Where will I see this change?
A: We’re rolling out these changes in stages, so in the coming months you will see country-specific domains implemented in additional countries.

Q. Does Google provide notice to blog owners when it removes content?
A: Yes. When content is removed from a blog, the author and any account administrators are notified by email and receive a message on their Blogger dashboard.

Q: What would a reader see if a post is removed from a blog?
A: When content is removed from a blog for any reason, readers attempting to access it will see a message indicating that the content has been removed. A copy of every removal notice we receive relating to Blogger is sent to Chilling Effects for publication on their web site. In addition, we disclose the number and nature of government requests for content removal biannually in our Transparency Report.

Q. Can users outside of the United States still access the service’s .com domains?
A. Yes, we allow anyone to view the .com version of a Blogger blog by typing: http://[blogname].blogspot.com/ncr – which always goes to the .com version of the blog. The “no country redirect” (ncr) will temporarily prevent Blogger from redirecting readers to the local version of the blog.

Q: How do I do this for a single post URL, and not the entire blog?
A: Place /ncr/ just after the country-specific domain to access the individual post. For instance, [blogname].blogspot.com/examplepage should be entered as [blogname].blogspot.com/ncr/examplepage.

Q: How will this change affect my blog?
A: Blog owners will not see any visible differences in their blog, but readers may notice a country-specific domain depending on their country of origin. Blog authors and/or owners will continue to manage and edit their content from Blogger.com. When we remove content that violates local law, we only do so for the country-specific domain.

Q: What happens if I have a custom domain?
A: Custom domains are unaffected by this change.

Q: Will this affect search engine optimization on my blog?
A: After this change, crawlers will find Blogspot content on many different domains. Hosting duplicate content on different domains can affect search results. We are making every effort to minimize any negative consequences of hosting Blogspot content on multiple domains.